Repairing a tin roof

I have a large carport about 20 feet wide. It has 2X8's spaced 2' apart with 2X4's crossing them at 4' intervals. The tin is regular corrugated roofing and is on top of the 2X4's. Problem is the nails are all coming up. They are aluminum nails with a rubber washer. I need to get on top of the tin to repair it. Was thinking of putting some 1/2" plywood on top of the tin and trying to walk on it. Then I decided to ask and avoid a neck breaking experience:)
For what it's worth, on the bottom of the 2X8 rafters are some 2X4's nailed to keep the 2X8's from twisting?? I guess that's why there are there. They are on 8' centers, the highest one is just over 10' off the ground. Was thinking of trying to prop up a few of the 2X8's using the 2X4's as stops to hold the top of the prop and just wedging the other end into the ground. The 2X8's are supported at one end by the building and at the other by some 4X4 posts with two 2X8's bolted together running between them. Seems stout. The 2X4's under the tin are worrying me.
So, what do I do? And, what do I replace the nails with?
Al
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How big are you Al? I walk my 250+ lbs around on a similar roof, the biggest problem I have is causing dents. I walk around with a broom stick & bang them out after I get down. As to fasteners, I use hex head, rubber washer screws intended for screwing into wood (Lowe's or Home Depot) & run them with a cordless drill with a hex tip. The hardest part is getting the nails completely out.
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200 pounds. I find it hard to believe the roof can hold you up if it's built like mine. How long are the screws and what are they called? Bought some #10, 1.5 inch long Phillips head sheet metal screws toady and some fender washers. This roof will never hold water but I'd like to stop water from rotting out the wood.
Al
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Look here: http://www.trufast.com / click products then scroll to panel to wood.
I'm careful only to step where the fasteners are, and therefore a support underneath. disclaimer: your results my vary, void where prohibited, following my advice could lead to serious injury, if this is a concern, do not.
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If it bothers you you can always lay a ladder across the roof, and move around on that. It will slow you down quite a bit, though.
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Al
You will NEVER hold water with sheet metal screws and fender washers. You CAN make it leakproof. I'm a farmer and work with tin roofs all the time. On an old barn I take a caulking gun with silicone caulk, apply a blob of silicone around every loose nail (under the head), and slam it tight. Then cover EVERY nail head with this came caulk. You wont leak unless you got rust holes in the tin. Of course be sure to remove all junk and dirt before you start. Use push broom and hose, let it dry, then do the job.
However, you can do even better. Get NEO-NAILS (neoprene washer nails), get some longer than what you have now. Better yet, NEO-SCREWS (hex head neoprene washer screws). Add some new ones if needed and replace all loose ones. Still caulk with silicone all the original heads, right over the head and extend onto surrounding tin for 1/4" or so.
To walk on roof, jsut stay on the lumber underneath, or use 2x8 walk boards.
DO NOT USE THE SHEET METAL SCREWS
Mark
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Thanks Mark. I'll let you know what hospital I end up in:)
Al
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