Repair a broken CHIMINEA style patio fireplace


A friend of mine had some high winds and her patio table was blown into and knocked over her CHIMINEA style patio fireplace. It was a fairly clean break right where the chimney starts.
She has built a small fire in it after the accident and reports that there is only a small amount of smoke leaking around the crack. Looking for something simple to secure the two pieces back together. I thought of fire clay but that might not be so simple. I would prefer something she could do herself.
You guys aware of anything in a tube that might work? Some type of fire caulk?
This is not a large model but I imagine it does reach a fairly high temperature.
This page illustrates the type of product we are talking about: http://www.readingcasual.com/chimineas.htm
Colbyt
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there is a product that is used to repair kilns. you can get it at ceramic supply stores or online. the product name is called sairset.
http://www.seattlepotterysupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Store_Code=sps_ecat&Screen=PROD&Product_Code1376-QT
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 11:32:01 -0400, "Colbyt"

A pottery group might be a better place to ask. Personally I'd be afraid of there being a thousand small hidden cracks just waiting for the worst possible time to cause the whole thing to explode.
You're talking about pottery that will be asked to go from ambient temperature to several hundred degrees in a few minutes.
Jim
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wrote:

The good news is that clay chimineas are made in two pieces. The chimney is made separately and then the two pieces are joined together with some clay slurry as a "glue". It's a structural weak spot. A little furnace cement from inside will probably keep it from smoking. Other common solutions are red RTV silicone, or high heat epoxy. It's entirely likely that the integrity of the firebox has not been compromised at all by this.
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A plumbing, heating, fireplace or even some hardware stores should have a mortar mix for high temps- boilers-fireplaces etc. Dont buy anything in a tube, mortars cure by chemical reaction. But nothing may bond well
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