renting trucks from uhaul - do any of purchase the optional insurance?

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I would bet that statement is untrue. For example, I highly doubt that collision coverage on a 5 year old economy Hyundai is going to pay for the cost of a totalled rental Lincoln Navigator.
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In article <2c81afd2-0f32-49e2-a27c-2c43071d0593

No, but the liability coverage will, assuming your insurance covers your use of another vehicle. That's why it's important to CHECK.
-- Keith
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You insure the car, not the driver. Better read it closer.
s

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Obviously you don't have a clue here. Vehicles don't cause accidents, people do. As Kurt pointed out, almost all policies cover the policy holder for liability, regardless of who's car they happens to be driving. That means if I borrow someone's car and cause an accident, my insurance company will cover me to the limits of my policy for damage and injuries I caused to the vehicle I hit. This only makes sense. You think I want to get behind the wheel of someone else's car, say while sharing driving on a trip, have an accident, and then find out they only have the minimal coverage and the accident exceeds that? Or that they let the policy lapse and have no insurance? I don't care about that, because MY policy protects me.
Now, if you have collision coverage on your car, in most cases, that coverage may not extend to another vehicle you happen to be driving.

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It seems to me that the insurance industry gets to have it both ways. It would make sense (to most people I think) for liability coverage to follow the driver and collision/comprehensive coverage to follow the car.
BUT...if I own four cars and have collision/comprehensive coverage on NONE of them I still have to obtain (and pay for) four policies. Why is this the case? I can only be behind the wheel of one car at a time.
Also I was hit several years ago while borrowing my sister-in-law's car. It was HER insurance company that got involved, not mine. These would seem to indicate that the coverage follows the car, not the driver.
BUT...if a four driver household has only one vehicle they still need a policy for each of the drivers, not just one (right?). And that seems to indicate that the coverage follows the driver and not the car.
Bottom line is that whatever situation causes the insurance company to collect the most money seems to be the rule.
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That's how it works in most cases.

The insurance company assumes, with some validity, that if you have 4 cars, there are more drivers than just you and there is more driving. I would agree that there should be a policy that only protects one driver.

The key here is that YOU were hit. Had you hit a bus full of nuns, the situation would be radically different. They could have come after YOU and your SIL.

No, they need a policy for the one vehicle. Along the way, they will disclose that there are 4 drivers regularly using the vehicle. The policy will then cover the owner.
And that seems to

No.
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In article <17384963-e8ae-47bd-8c66-cc46fec967c2

There are many options available for this.
From most companies, you can insure all four vehicles, rate one of them as the one you drive regularly, and insure the other three at reduced rates as rarely-driven vehicles.
Some companies will allow you to keep liability coverage on just one vehicle, and keep the others "laid up," not in use, and put liability coverage on them only when you're actually using them. The liability rate is higher per day, but you only pay for it when you're using it.
Some specialty insurers do have liability-only coverage that follows the driver in any owned or non-owned vehicle.

If the four drivers are all disclosed to the insurance company, and are all rated on the vehicle, then the policy can be written to cover all four of the drivers, not just the owner. The four drivers will have liability coverage when they drive other vehicles, too, *except*, generally, vehicles they have regular access to. (In other words, if you borrow your friend's car occasionally, you're generally covered. If your friend lets you borrow the car for six months and keep it parked at your house, you should check with your agent about getting non-owner coverage on that car.)
Disclaimer: I am not your insurance agent, I haven'r read your policy, coverage varies by company, policy, state, etc.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
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My experience indicates that what is required in this case is a single policy with a higher rate for having extra drivers in the household.

- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you have car insurance, check the policy to see if you're covered for your liability while driving a rental vehicle.
If not, then if you hit someone or hit property, they can go after you. I imagine they would sue both you and the truck rental company - to hit you with a judgement, and get something from the truck rental company if the judgement is not satisfied by bankrupting you.
I get the optional insurance. I am not the best truck driver in the world, due to not having much experience driving them, and often driving them at more stressful times (moving).
If I end up making a klutzy maneuver with the truck, I would prefer to not have my car insurance company being asked to pay for the damage and the lawyers. If my insurance company pays a claim for a "chargeable accident", my premium payment goes up substantially for 3 years.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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As noted, check with your car insurance and even you home/apartment insurance. You may already be covered. No need to pay twice.
Another common source is a credit card. Many credit cards will cover a rental car, that does not mean it includes trucks, but it may well cover them as well, check. The car rental people make a lot of money on those add ons.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Oddly enough I did just that last week, rented a truck to move some stuff my car can't. I was surprised at how much this place wanted for insurance so I didn't spring for it. I know from earlier experience that my insurance does not cover rental trucks, just cars.
Needless to say, being uninsured, I ran my errands and got rid of that truck as soon as I could.
This place wanted $40 for the day, a blatant ripoff. A different place I used last year was $10 and I thought that was fair.
I'm not offering advice either way. I took a chance and got away with it.
nancy
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One other point that may have already been mentioned is that the rental company will want their money for damage immediately. If you haven't purchased their insurance they will run your credit card to the max to get their money. They aren't going to wait for you to file a claim with your car ins. or a credit card company.

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