Removing vinyle sideing, then replacing with the removed siding

I have a window I need to replace on a small wall on the north side of my h ouse. I got to thinking, I wonder if I could remove the siding on that one wall, replace the window, and add on top of the osn aome 1 inch insulating sheets to increase the r value of the walls. (I have batts in the 2x4 wall currently.)
I guess my question is, does this sound like a dumb idea and is it possible to take off vinyle siding and get it re installed looking right?
If this was doable I might as I have time add the insulating sheets to the entire house.
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On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 8:16:35 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

house. I got to thinking, I wonder if I could remove the siding on that on e wall, replace the window, and add on top of the osn aome 1 inch insulatin g sheets to increase the r value of the walls. (I have batts in the 2x4 wal l currently.)

le to take off vinyle siding and get it re installed looking right?

e entire house.
Sure it's possible. Is it worth it? I doubt it. And you have to deal with doing something to make up the areas where it no longer fits, corners for example. If you put an extra 1" on one side, how are you going to deal with the corners that are now to short on the other side? If the siding has been up there for 20 years, good luck matching it so that it isn't noticeable. In most houses, there are much easier things that could be done to cost effectively lower energy usage, eg putting more insulation in the attic.
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To add to trader4's comments, putting 1" insulation behind the siding is going to screw up all of the trim at the corners, windows, doors, soffits, etc.
However, to answer your specific question about removing the siding, it is certainly doable. I recently R&R a number of pieces that were damaged when a storm pulled the service wires off of the house. I was lucky enough to have a few pieces that I saved from when I installed a patio door many (20?) years ago. I had just enough to replace the damage pieces. They match fine, considering it's up at the top of the house and any difference isn't noticeable from the ground, through the trees.
Anyway, if you want to remove the siding to install the window, what you want is one of these tools:
http://www.industrialladder.com/userImages/productImages/SRT-2.jpg
You can buy one at any home center, but that link shows you how they work, and they do work very well. One key thing to remember when you reinstall the siding is to leave it loose so that it can expand and contract with the weather. You use roofing nails with big heads so that they cover the slot in the siding but allow it to move.
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On Wed, 7 May 2014 13:40:23 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

This was not luck. You were smart enough to save what you removed.
When I bought my 4-year old house, the seller had all the receipts, including where he bought the carpeting and kitchen vinyl linoleum.
I went there and got some spare linoleum, and tried to get carpet too, but she didn't have any. I asked why the scraps weren't left behind. She said the housewives called up and complained.
(The owner had spilled paint in the middle of the main bedroom, so much he couldn't clean it and had to cut a square out of a closet, he said, to patch it with. Strangely, I never found a closet with a missing square, or one with a paint-stained square.)

People getting new houses or new siding should save all the scraps, or pay a little extra, if necessary and get some brand new spare siding. Even if it doesn't quite match 15 years later it probably will catch up in a few years.
They should get spare of practically everything.
OTOH, if there is no spare siding, some people use a complimentary color, like light blue for one side of a white house.
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On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 7:16:35 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

house. I got to thinking, I wonder if I could remove the siding on that on e wall, replace the window, and add on top of the osn aome 1 inch insulatin g sheets to increase the r value of the walls. (I have batts in the 2x4 wal l currently.)

le to take off vinyle siding and get it re installed looking right?

e entire house.
I was inder the impression that 1/2 inch foam board could be added without gaps and other problems?
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On Thu, 8 May 2014 05:50:50 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

How can that be? Not based on whatever you were told, but after thinking about it. The siding will now be 1/2 inch farther from the rest of the wall. Instead of touching the window frame like it probably used to, it will be 1/2" away. Instead of touching the siding on the adjacent side of the house, it will be 1/2" away.
Right?
If not, why not?
I guess the reason is that there is supposed to be empty space behind the siding, or behind whatever is behind the siding. That the foam can be trimmed a little smaller than the siding and fhus fit in the empty space. Or whatever is behind the siding nowcan be pushed in so that it is in the empty space and the foam is where that stuff had been. About this I cannot say. Maybe if they're tearing down a home like yours somewhere, you can watch and see how the walls are made inside. Or you can peek in your own wall.
Or you can ask more people.
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On Thursday, May 8, 2014 3:58:52 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

my house. I got to thinking, I wonder if I could remove the siding on that one wall, replace the window, and add on top of the osn aome 1 inch insula ting sheets to increase the r value of the walls. (I have batts in the 2x4 wall currently.)

sible to take off vinyle siding and get it re installed looking right?

the entire house.

ut gaps and other problems?

My windows are vinyle windows with a channel that the sliding slides into. It looks as if there is some open air space, maybe enough to where the slid ding can be still fit behind it. Also, On the cornet pieces, why cant you j ust raise the j channel with the 1/2 inch foam underneath it?
I guess what I am saying, is there looks like there is a possibility of get ting siding to fit under the existing channels and windows, albeit it might be a tight fit.
Maybe I m wrong.
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On Thu, 08 May 2014 20:54:05 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@work.com wrote:

Yes, very important.
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On Thu, 8 May 2014 16:09:08 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I can't picture this, and even if I could, there's a lot I don't know about construction.

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On Friday, May 9, 2014 8:07:23 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

It's also worth noting that initially he said he wanted to add 1" of foam board insulation. With that I see the same problems that you and others have pointed out. Now it's down to 1/2" might squeeze in somehow. Even if it can, I don't see the compelling savings to adding 1/2" of insulation, compared to all the cost/work involved of removing the siding off the side of a house. Do they even make 1/2" foam board product? What's the R value?
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If the OP can't find 1/2" foam insulation he can buy a _really_ big bandsaw and resaw the 1” sheets down to the size he needs.
Foam insulation warms you twice.
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