Removing old shut-off valves from bathroom faucet


Anyone have advice on how best to remove old shut-off valves under a bathroom sink? I've tried the WD-40 thing -- and it worked for all the fittings -- except for where the valves themselves connect to the pipe stems coming out of the walls.
Will heating them help?
Thanks!
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On Jan 27, 12:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Might -- particularly if they happen to be sweated fittings... :)
If not soldered, some heat can still be useful to loosen stuff -- just be careful (obviously) w/ the open flame in a closed area. A piece of sheet metal can be useful as a heat shield in that regard.
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How about cutting them off and then using a compression nut to connect the new valves?

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Do you know what is stubbed out of the wall Copper or threaded pipe. I guessing it's threaded. If it's an older home it's probably Iron pipe. If it's copper you could take the angle stop apart the nut that remains ( compression fitting) on the pipe should spin easy, then you could find a new angle stop that fits the old nut. They also make feral puller or you put a cut in it with hacksaw blade and split it.( don't cut the pipe) If it's iron pipe if you get it out buy a 3/4" fitting brush clean the inside threads and replace with a brass nipple. Be careful not to over tighten or you can split the fitting in the wall.

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