Removing dishwasher when Laminate Flooring runs right up to it

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Hi,
We're in the final days of having our new house built with the first walk through scheduled for later this week, but one thing I wasn't sure about is the dishwasher and laminate flooring. The dishwasher sits on the concrete and the laminate flooring in the kitchen runs right up to the dishwasher -- dishwasher was installed before flooring. There's no gap between the top of the dishwasher and the bottom of the counter top, so my worry is that the dishwasher won't be able to be removed without pulling up the counter top or flooring.
In an email to the builder he said it would come out, which I'll have him demo when we do the walk through, but I wanted to do some research before then as well. I know it's not their first rodeo so I assume I'm just not seeing the 'trick' to getting it out, but with the dishwasher being so snug in there I'm just not seeing how to get it out when it needs to be replaced or repaired.
Thanks for any advise.
Sam
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Most dishwashers have adjustable feet near the front. When these get raised the DW should come out with no problem.
They look tight when all of the trim is installed but the piece at the bottom is adjustable to match the finished floor height. The top near the counter is higher than the body of the DW so once that clears the bottom of the counter you'll have plenty of clearance.
This picture shows a side view where you can see that they are smaller on the inside.
http://www.single-family-home-remodeling.com/images/dishwasher-blanket-large.jpg
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Take out the screw at the top center (usually) that holds it to the counter top and keeps it from tipping when the door is open' *then* raise the feet.
--

dadiOH
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Alex wrote:

It can come out with little more work. Leveling legs can be lowered and it can slide out over the laminate top. Any how that is years from now. After 15 years oue DW is still running good.(knock on the wood!)
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This is a new house? I'm surprised the builder did it like that. Much easier to put flooring first, then cabinets and appliances on top. But as others have said, it can come out wih a little work.
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Yeah but the builder could save maybe $63 by not putting the flooring down first...
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re: "Much easier to put flooring first, then cabinets and appliances on top"
I've never had a house built, so this is new to me.
Are you saying that other builders would have put laminate flooring throughout the kitchen before the base cabinets were installed and then put the cabinets on top of that? Wouldn't that be a waste of a lot of laminate flooring?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

First, if they are doing a really nice job, the time they save putting down flooring first (no cutting to fit against the cabinet bases...) Would almost pay for the extra flooring.
Second, the finished look is much better when putting cabinets on top of the flooring.
Also I've seen more than once where they put the flooring down just enough for the front of the cabinets to sit on, then use scraps under the back of the cabinets to keep them level. Very little waste and a nicer looking job.
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My problem is laminate, in a KITCHEN???? No way, no how, never!
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h wrote:

Uh, why not?
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I agree , but maybe budget constraints are the issue...Still I would have used vinyl first..JMHO....
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Agreed. Laminate is NEVER appropriate for a kitchen. Unless you never, ever use it. I have several friends with McMansions and their kitchen counters and appliances are the only dusty surfaces - they never, ever cook. Bizarre!
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h wrote:

I ask again, why not?
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benick wrote:

Some, but probably not all, manufactured laminate is impervious to water. Also dog drool, baby pee, petroleum solvents, alcohol, fuming acids, and molten lava.
I had some laminate left over from reworking a spare room and used it for the kitchen's COUNTERTOP! (It looks like butcher-block). After about a year, I've added to laminate's list of features that it doesn't stain, scratch, break, expand, or do anything but just sit there and look swell.
Much like my first wife.
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h wrote:

Absolutely false. Perhaps the kind of manufactured laminate made from discarded Cherrios' boxes will have some problem, but the laminate I've used is impervious to water.
When I say "impervious," I mean unaffected within the precision of my measuring instruments, visual inspection with a loupe, or any practical experience.
You are grievously mistaken and I caution you: Others with views similar to yours have been locked away in places with "Asylum" in their names.
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rmorton wrote:

I did that with $.79 laminate from Lumber Liquidators, except I used a micrometer. And left the stuff in the water for a MONTH!
Thickness expansioni was within 0.001", lateral expansion was within 0.002," both of which were within the precision limitations of my micrometer.
I worked on scraps with a wood rasp, a nail, and a rock. I banged it with a hammer. No scratches or dents.
I'm tellin' you, they should use that stuff as water-line armor plating for battleships. If we still had battleships.
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Yup, that's how we did the floor when we tiled. We figured out the center, laid the tiles about 3 inches over where the appliances and cabinets would start, and then used tile scraps in the back corners of each cabinet. The appliances had adjustable back feet for leveling. Not exactly rocket science and it looks great.
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wrote:

For starters, every manufacturer recommends putting your cabinets in _B/4_ the flooring. Here's just one example. Scroll to item #13. http://na.pergo.com/Images/how_to/Install_Essentials_Guide.pdf
There's several reasons for this. Laminate needs to expand/contract, a permanent fixture on top of the laminate will prohibit this, causing problems. Another reason is if you need to replace panel/planks/tiles, and the cabinets are installed on top.....well, now you got problems.
You've never seen a professional install flooring then sit the cabinets on edge & shim the back. This would have to be one hell of a hack.
Please show just one manufacturer which would recommend putting the cabinets first. And, you've got to be kidding about saving time of not cutting/scribing around objects. A professional will cut around anything as fast as they will a straight cut. Good grief, just when I thought I heard everything.
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Way to go Ralph! That should say, "please show just one manufacturer, which recommends putting the _FLOORING_ first.
My bad!!!
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Please show me one manufacturer who prefers laminate flooring over ceramic tile in a kitchen. The idea of laminate in a kitchen does not sound right. Usually you put laminate if you want to spruce up an existing kitchen or do a kitchen makover, but not in a brand new house.
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