refrigerator power requirement 15A or 20A?

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I am shoping for a refrigerator. I can only connact to a 15A circuit.
I looked some of the Maytag and Kenmore models. Some just listed as UL rating. Some stated that the maximum amps is 20.
So do I need a 20A circuit for a refrigerator? The fridge will be in a finished basement.
Thanks for input.
Y.
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Why don't you just up the breaker to a 20 AMP?
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Yeah, or just jumper around it.
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Yeah, or just jumper around it.
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OK if you up the wire along with it. There are codes for wire size and breaker size and it was developed to prevent fires.
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wrote in message

Ooops!
My house has mostly 12-2 wire so going from a 15 to 20 amp breaker would work. Probably not to code to have a 20 amp on 14-2 wire......
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----------- That's right. 12-2 for 20 amp is code. 14-2 is 15 amp max by code.
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Color me curious, but why would you be running a 15A breaker on a circuit wired with 12GA in the first place? Might as well let the circuit work up to its capacity.
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because most appliances are 15 amp or less. if one goes haywire and smokes itself the 15 amp breaker will trip before the 20
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The cable might have its ampacity reduced due to bundling, running through a hot attic, etc. The rule of thumb of "14 AWG for 15 A" and "12 AWG for 20 A" is generally acceptable but not always -- the real NEC rules are quite a bit more complicated.
--
Steve Kives -- Unix sysadmin/netadmin -- Denver, CO
Forward and fiaka, Manacle an den gosaka
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Yeah, or just jumper around it.
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Code only requires a 15A circuit. Doesn't even have to be dedicated, although it ain't a bad idea.
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I don't know where you got your code book Andy, but mine says 20 amp dedicated.
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Hmmmm. Code book probably came out of the same bubble-gum machine my super-spy decoder ring came out of.
Could've sworn 2002 NEC (which is my reference copy) put the 'fridge on one of the two required Small Appliance circuits in the kitchen. Either I'm mis-remembering (highly likely), or one of the newer NECs has added yet another gratuitous dedicated circuit (there's so many required dedicated circuits anymore, there must be kickbacks from the breaker box industry involved).
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Naw. I don't really have a code book.
Got ya.
But, when I was doing residential electric.... anything other than a dedicated 12 gauge 20 amp circuit would fail inspection everytime; and that was back in 1981.
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Got me, I guess. Went and checked my doorstop, I mean, the NEC, and at least the 2002 allows the 'fridge to be on one of the kitchen SA circuits (which have to be 20A, 'tho -- mis-remembered that one). Sure seems unlikely the newer NECs would require a dedicated circuit...newer 'fridges draw *less* juice than the older ones, not less.
1981 seriously predated my trying to go by code. I occasionally helped my dad wire up stuff around the house in that timeframe, but I can guarantee that a large part of it never met code by any reasonable definition. Wonder if that "required 20A dedicated circuit" you had to deal with was a local code requirement?
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Yah... could be; probably was local code. All I remember is wiring kitchens was a real bitch cause of all the different dedicated circuits you had to run for DW/Disposal, and appliances. I always hated stringing 12 ga wire. Always got along real well with 14 ga; but 12 ga and higher always pissed me off. Except for 8 ga copper to the stove.. it always went in no problem.
One time I was in this SEVERLY HIGH END residential remodel job... some freaking mansion from like 1920 that was being updated, and whoever roughed the kitchen in ran 10 ga to an appliance outlet, but left the old box in place, and the box was like 1/4 deep, or so it seemed, and I was futzing with it and futzing with it and then I started cussing at it and finally just got completely pissed and jammed everything in, and put the cover plate on, and it looked like complete hell cause the outlet was crooked and also was not flush; and I turned around and walked straight into the owner who had been watching me the whole time. Ah, memories.
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The dedicated circuit for the fridge (whether required or not) is a good idea for two reasons:
1) The kitchen circuits must be GFCI these days, and nuisance tripping of those outlets means your ice cream could melt.
2) All the high power draws of modern kitchen appliances are more likely to trip breakers, again causing your ice cream to melt.
It seems to me that a dedicated one-receptacle circuit for the fridge (allowable by NEC to be non-GFCI) is a small price to pay for peace of mind.
--
Steve Kives -- Unix sysadmin/netadmin -- Denver, CO
Forward and fiaka, Manacle an den gosaka
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

super-spy
one of

another
So now the fellow that wants a frig in his basement has to run a dropcord upstairs to the kitchen receptical :-)
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As long as he ain't getting inspected, it don't matter. Hell, I run my 'fridge offa two bare wires running from my washer outlet. Only took the baby a couple of times before she lernt to crawl around the wires.
BTW, ;-}
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