Refrigerator Backup

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Hello, I have a desire to backup my refrigerator during power outages. Let's say I buy a generator with sufficient power to do so. A whole house transfer switch is not appropriate because the small generator is nowhere near big enough to handle the whole house. The cord on the refrigerator is very hard to get to because the refrigerator is built in. If I were to run the 12-2 line that currently runs from the outlet to the breaker box into a new box containing a SPDT switch and wire it to connect the hot wire from the outlet to either the original breaker or a heavy duty extension cord plugged into the generator, would that meet code? (By code, I mean NEC, not local variations. I don't want to ask a local inspector if the answer is going to be "no way".)
If the above is not acceptable, how about cutting the line running to the refrigerator outlet and then installing an outlet near the breaker box and a plug to connect them back together? During a power outage, I would remove the plug from the outlet and plug it into the extension cord coming from the generator. Would having a plug and outlet in the line violate code?
Here's a crude attempt at an ascii drawing (please view with a fixed width font): == is 12-2 w gnd normal house wiring. -- is the refrigerator cord plugged into the outlet behind the refrigerator.
Today: Breaker-Box======================outlet<Plug-----Refrigerator
Idea #1: Breaker-Box====SPDT-Switch=======outlet<Plug-----Refrigerator || || || Generator
Idea #2: Breaker-Box===new-outlet<new-plug====outlet<Plug-----Refrigerator
TIA for any advice, Pat
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On Jul 7, 11:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

Using plugs gets around code. I'm thinking using original breaker to outlet. Another outlet to generator. Plug from original line to fridge. These outlets would be near outside the box or another location. No switches involved.
Greg
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I ran a line from the generator to a plug box mounted right under the house current box that the refrigerator plugs into. When the lights go out, I unplug from house current and into the generator box. Since your plug is hard to get to, run the line to the basement and have the side-by-side plugs. Be sure to label them.
Paul
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Hi Greg, Thanks for the input. To be clear, you are saying it is OK for a line that plugs into an outlet to run into hidden spaces and power a normal outlet somewhere else in the house. Right?
Pat
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On Jul 7, 12:35 pm, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

That's right. It's basically your device. That might be a problem for future owners.
Greg
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A fridge would run on a 1kw generator but would have start up problems. I would not go with less than 2kw.
Greg
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I am actually planning to use a 1.5 kw inverter connected to a Prius. It can run my frig including start-up.
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On Jul 7, 8:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

You are aware that the current generation prius battery is 200v, the early generations were 280v? Have you found an inverter for that?
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On Jul 8, 9:12 am, "Stormin Mormon"

They have a 12v battery for accessories. I think it's been pretty well established that a 12v car battery won't run much of anything for any period. A fridge will be 4-500 watts when running. That's about 35 amps at 12v,
Off the hybrid battery it would be more like a couple amps. Problem then is finding an inverter that works at the hybrid battery voltage. And since volages on hybrids varies pretty widely it would be a good idea to find one with a wide supply range so that it works with your next hybrid. I'm thinking that the inverter costs for this theoretical project is now in the thousands.
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On Fri, 8 Jul 2011 06:29:46 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

I just responded in the other thread, but I plan to use 12 volts, not the higher traction battery voltage. The car uses a DC to DC converter to keep the 12 volt battery charged and starts its engine periodically to keep the traction battery charged. The 2004 to 2009 model can supply 1000 watts continuously while the 2010 can supply 1500 watts. Other have used the traction battery for this, but I don't want to modify the car.
To answer another question, the 12 volt battery is in the trunk making it easy to directly attach to it and store the inverter there.
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On Jul 8, 9:58 am, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

..
Then you are basically using your car as a generator. Anyone can do that. It's a rather cumbersome solution but does have the virtue of simplicity. The food in my fridge is not a real big worry for me. If we loose power for a couple days sitting in the dark and sometimes cold and cooking everything on the grill gets old fast. I have a 4kw generator I paid $500 for. It runs my entire house. I backfeed. We use the tv, the computers, the lights, the microwave, etc. In the winter we have central heat.
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On Fri, 8 Jul 2011 07:11:37 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc
That is true.

That is also true, but the Prius has the advantage of only running the gasoline engine as required. Most other vehicles will run the engine continuously at idle. ... That's not a show stopper, but it wastes energy. A properly sized generator is more efficient than either one, but I already have the Prius and don't need power backup very often.
Thanks to you and all the others who provided input.
Pat
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http://hiwaay.net/~bzwilson/prius/priups.html
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On 7/11/2011 9:20 PM, Congoleum Breckenridge wrote:

another: http://www.priups.com/misc/intro.htm
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On Fri, 8 Jul 2011 05:55:06 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

I intend to use 12 volts, not the higher traction battery voltage. The car will use the traction battery to keep the 12 volt battery charged (via a built-in DC to DC converter) and occassionally use the gasoline engine to keep the traction battery charged. There are many threads in various news groups and forums covering this topic. This, of course, isn't as efficient as a dedicated generator, but I will never have to worry about stale gas or not being able to start a seldomly used generator. I am told the car will supply 1000 to 1500 watts for about a week on a single tank of gas.
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On Fri, 8 Jul 2011 08:41:43 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Yes. It works with my refrigerator. The inverter is 1500 continuous and 3000 watts peak.
Pat
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On Jul 8, 8:41 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Any speculations on why the battery/inverter setup failed to run the furnace? I have a relatively new furnace, and I don't want its control board getting clobbered by a few spikes in the genny output.
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On Jul 7, 10:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

I like idea 2, it is simple and easy to understand now, and in the future too.
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On Jul 7, 11:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

If you are loosing power for long enough for a fridge to get warm then I suggest you might as well get a generator that can supply you with more power. I comfortably run my whole 3000 sqft house with the exception of major appliance such as the hvac, electric oven, and electric dryer off of a cheap 4400 watt generator. Since I only use it for power outages I don't care that it won't last for thousands of hours. You can get a used one for a few hundred dollars on craigs list, a new one for 5 or 600.
I backfeed it and there are code compliant ways to do that. All you need is a pair of breakers at the top of your main panel and a mechanical lockout for the panel main. http://www.interlockkit.com / I open the breakers to the major appliances I don't want to run. It will run both my air handlers since I have gas heat.
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I agree. That gives a flexible, safe, code compliant solution where you can choose what circuits you want to power at any given time.
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