Recessed AC outlet behind refrigerator?

We are planning to replacing our refrigerator with a new one that is deeper than the current one. There is a regular surface-mount AC outlet on the wall directly behind our refrigerator. I would like to replace it with a recessed AC outlet, so that I can gain additional clearance behind the new fridge.
I can't find such an outlet on the web, possibly because I do not know what it is called in the trade. Anyone know?
Thanks! BC
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BC Drums wrote:

You'll need a deep box to acommodate it.
Jim
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The problem you may have is that most new refrigerators come with angle plugs which may not fit in the recessed outlet

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wrote:

Be careful. The fridge needs to be several inches from the wall. Otherwise it will overheat and burn out the compressor.
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Not really. The older units with coils on the back were self limiting by the spacers on the back. New units need far less clearance as quoted below from the Kitchen Aid manual. To ensure proper ventilation for your refrigerator, allow for 1/2"
(1.25 cm) space on each side and at the top. When installing your
refrigerator next to a fixed wall, leave 2" (5.08 cm) minimum on
each side (depending on your model) to allow for the door to
swing open. If your refrigerator has an ice maker, allow extra
space at the back for the water line connections.
NOTE: Do not install the refrigerator near an oven, radiator, or
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In alt.home.repair on Sat, 30 Jul 2005 12:27:48 GMT "Edwin Pawlowski"

I guess they consider the back to be a side. Although I too would think if the coils are on the bottom and not the back, a half inch would be enough. It just bothers me that they don't say "back", only "side".

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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I'd consier the back a side in this case, expecialy since the coils are on the bottm on most units today. They also mention top. With coils on the back you need move ventilcation on the top for the air to flow over the coils.

They also point this out as an exception so again, I'd say it is the side.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

not important. In many refrigerators and freezers, the coils are hidden just under the sheet metal of the sides and the top. A quick check of a running refrig will tell where the coils are and what part needs to have space between it and any wall.
What I don't understand is why the necessity of plugging the refrigerator into a socket behind the refrigerator. If there is an outlet to the side, plug it into that. If there isn't an outlet to the side, then put one in.
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Are you sure there's enough room inside the wall to accomodate it?
STFW gives numerous links for recessed outlets, here's one: http://www.residential-landscape-lighting-design.com/store/PPF/parameters/234_77/more_info.asp
I seem to recall boxes that had the outlet inside at a 90 degree angle. Something akin to a floor box with a door.
But as another post mentioned, what about ventilation? If you don't allow the manufacturer's recommended clearances you'll burn it up (not right away but it'll definitely die sooner than it should).
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"Clock outlets" are recessed - may or may not work for your refrigerator plug, and as another post noted, they take a lot more space in the box - which may not be available.
The refrigerator may have a 90 plug with the cord exiting parallel to the wall. This would probably get you about as close to the wall as the baseboard would allow.
Bud--
BC Drums wrote:

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