Reason For Dead Phones?

Page 1 of 2  
Worsening static and now completely dead. The phones test OK on the network interface device box attached to the exterior siding of the house, which suggests that the problem is inside the house. We have a maintainance policy for inside the house. Could this problem be due to mice chewing wires? If so is there a danger? -- Worried
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
 We have a

The mice are the ones to worry... the voltage on the wires is around 75 Volts, DC, on an open line, IIRC. Enough to get their attention, but NOT a fire hazard, as the current is limited in the local loop.
Since you do have a contract, now is the time to call the. You might check -- are ALL interior jacks giving trouble, or just one or two? If only one, check for loose wire, just tighten them down a tad.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 06:20:53 -0700 (PDT), professorpaul

Thanks, that's a relief.

Called Verizon Friday and they said a tech would be here Monday, which is hard to believe. In the past, we've had to wait five or more days for service, and now with much of their resources being allocated to FIOS, I expected an even longer wait. Now let's see if he shows up Monday.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
professorpaul wrote:

Hmmm, 75V DC? Where is that number coming from?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

-48VDC + inflation or Oabama's stimulus?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

Out of his professional posterior orifice. The nominal on hook DC battery voltage on a POTS line is 48 volts DC. I've never seen it run over 55 volts DC on a CO line. The nominal ringer voltage is 90 volts AC at 20 HZ or 20 cycles per second for the electronically correct. Party lines use different ringer frequencies for each customer.
TDD
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I respectfully disagree.
Two-party service (2FR) signals the "ring party" by delivering ringing current on the ring side of the pair that passes through a specially-wired telephone to ground. The "tip party" is signaled by ringing on the other conductor through a specially-wired set to ground.
4, 6 and 8-party service also uses the above technique on a single pair but uses distinctive ringing patterns assigned to each party. Example: Two, short rings.
On an eight-party line, only FOUR parties hear ringing.
OBTrivia: Multi-party service was originally required due to inadequate infrastructure (not enough pairs). The customers were "bridged" in the field.
As enough pairs became available, many subscribers re-graded to private service (1FR, 1FB, etc). Those that kept their two-party service were bridged in the Central Office. This allowed for easier trouble shooting.
As party line subscribers died off, moved or re-graded to 1FR, their former partymates enjoyed virtually private service at the lower, two-party rate.
About once a year, the business office would call these "bridged alone" subscribers and offer them a private line using Measured Rate service that was about the same price. About half of these folks would re-grade. Those that didn't were in for a surprise:
The Central Office Technician would then connect each remaining, bridged alone subscriber with a new partymate. Most of those would then promptly call to change to private service.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Redelfs wrote:

New technology, I'm 45 years behind on that one. I haven't seen a party line in that long but it was the different frequency response ringer type, all the ringers would tap whenever anyone on the party line was called with only the called party getting a full ring. It was in a rural area and hunters were always putting buckshot through those nice lead cased overhead lines. "Maw, the phones out uhgin." "Dang that Earl, he don't never know what he's a shootn at."
TDD
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Through the 70's and 80's, I always ordered 2 party service. It was much cheaper and there was never another party. At that time, in that place, I think most people didn't know you could get multi-party service. -- Doug
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Jun 2009 09:10:45 -0500, Jim Redelfs

There were at least four subscribers on the party line when I was growing up. There wee never any rings for someone else. Also, there were just 2 wires connected to the house.
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It sure was fun back then to listen to people's conversations. he he
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Murriel wrote:

Mice chewing wires, or more likely a spider nest in the back of the demarc box, or in the basement ceiling. How old is your house? In an older house, the spot in the basement where the demarc is jumpered over to the old legacy house wiring, is often not very well done. Or, it could simply be a fubar'd phone on one jack, or one rusty jack. Unplug ALL the phones, and carry one phone around from jack to jack to see if problem can be localized.
It can be a tedious PITA, but it ain't rocket science. Start with what you know works, the test jack at the demarc, and work back from there. Only change or add back one thing at a time.
No, there isn't any danger, unless you wear a pacemaker or something, and are holding tip in one hand and ring in the other, when the phone rings. If you are paying for inside maint, let them figure it all out.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank You.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 12:58:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@Home.org (Murriel) wrote:

    Are these standard telephone lines or are you using a cable phone service?
    Assuming it is traditional phone lines, then it could be nothing more than a poor connection somewhere. You just have to track it down.
    I don't know much about the line backer insurance policies. I suggest you read what is covered and see if it is covered. Funny thing about those. When I had traditional phone lines they tried to sell me that service. Under the rules of my local public utility commission, the provider was responsible for the interior lines, even without the insurance.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can easily determine if it is a short or an open circuit with a multi-meter. Remove all phones and detach the house phone wiring from the network inferface device. Now measure the resistance across the two middle contacts (red/green wires) of any phone jack. If the resistance is close to zero then you have a short.
If there is indeed a short, it would be interesting to see how the telco technician locate and fix it -- there is no simple tool to locate short circuit.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have miniature sockets (phone jacks) especially if they are mounted in a cool outside wall they could have moisture from condensed humidity from warm house air on them. That can cause corrosion to build up between those thin wire contacts. In a typical six contact jack the telephone line is often on the two closest together centre contacts. (Red/Green wires). When the phone is 'on hook' (not in use), there is some 48 volts DC across those two possibly humid contacts all the time. When the phone rings there can be some 100 volts AC across the contacts. So we have the ideal set-up for what is called 'tracking' whereby minute amounts of metal 'migrate' onto the insulation between the two contacts and make an intermittent and noisy connection across the phone line. Some years back the telephone utility I worked with had some considerable trouble with noisy phone jacks which by then had been in use for some 5 to 10 years. Cleaning the area between the contacts in each jack is often not successful and a better solution is to replace the corroded and 'crackly' ones. All the jacks should be wired back to a central point. And if a noisy jack/s is suspected each jack can be disconnected one at a time until the faulty one is found. And as suggested replaced. Unfortunately the much used design is a poor one; the centre contacts being no more than one millimetre apart! Permanent wiring of each phone or use of those 'old fashioned' four pin plugs was/is more reliable. Maybe this suggestion helps. I haven't heard of anyone blanking off telephone jacks that are in cool locations and as to whether this would prevent/slow down the corrosion/tracking/noise!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
james wrote:

Time Domain Reflectometer, fast and easy if you know how to use it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like something on Star Trek.
"Uhm, Kaptan, muh time domain refractometer be telling me we won't do warp speed until we get to a star base for repairs. Unless that green blooded pointy eared thing wants to have a try at it."
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it is a simple device that works like a closed circuit radar. It sends a pulse down the wiring and any problems will cause the pulse to bounce back. Time of travel indicates how far the problem is. High dollar enough that not very many would have one laying around the house.
Slightly more complicated than that, but close enough for a simple explination.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 13, 8:58οΏ½am, snipped-for-privacy@Home.org (Murriel) wrote:

UNPLUG ALL CORDLESS PHONES, then try a single old style corded phone thats proven working at the interface.
cordless phones are a main cause of wierd failures
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.