radon in basement

We did a radon test on our house and found it to be elevated to 6. We were told that it should have read 4.
It is a big deal to correct this problem. We live in Central New Jersey near Morristown,
Thank you
Jim
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"We live in Central New Jersey near Morristown, "
Last time I checked, Morristown was still in north jersey.
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On 27 Oct 2005 04:51:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

ok picky...we know how smart you are ...where's your answer to the question?
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"ok picky...we know how smart you are ...where's your answer to the question?"
If you read the OP, no question was ever posed.
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James Repetski wrote:

Look at the Building Science Corporation web site. They have a diagram of their suggested solution.
Since you haven't told us anything about the way your house is arranged, there is no way we can tell you if it is " a big deal " or not.
TB
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Who knows if its a big deal, you give no details, start with sealing all cracks in floor and walls and re test.
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I've looked at a lot of houses with radon systems installed, abd there is usually a way to do it that's not too invasive.
Get an estimate from a remediator, and they should come up with an estimate of $1000-$2500. The system is usually a 6-8 inch PVC pipe stuck through a hole punched into the middle of the basement slab, there's a motor and fan in the pipe, and the pipe exhausts somewhere outside the house (in a specific fashion, at a specific location).
I'm not sure if there are kits avail. to the 'public' for doing this, if you're of a mind to try it yourself. The only real not-off-the-shelf item is the fan-motor assembly, and the little manometer that tells you its actually working.
The good thing about having enough radon that you need to install a system, is that after you install it, you'll have far less radon than someone who didn't need the system. Properly installed, the systems are very effective.
A downside to doing it yourself is that you can't rtefer a future buyer of your house to the installing company. Some people are very skittish about a house that has a system.
Dave
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James Repetski wrote:

You are at the borderline for the EPA radon exposure standard. But many feel that standard is set at a ridiculously low level. In other words it's more a product of bureaucratic rectal extrapolation than real science. Dr. Geno Saccomanno did extensive research on Radon exposure in Uranium mines and he found that levels as high as 20 pCi/l have no measurable effects unless the people exposed are heavy smokers.
Fixing the problem usually runs $2500 for a slab vacuum fan and ducts. If it were me, I'd continue to monitor the levels, but I wouldn't bother doing anything unless they increased dramatically.
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