R22 or 410? New lineset?

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I'm going to upgrade my AC, probably to a 13 or 14 SEER. Is is best to just stick with the R22 in this case? When will R22 become more expensive than R410? From what I understand the units are similar in price, so that shouldn't be an issue.
If I do stick with R22, is there any need to replace the lineset? It's 15 years old? The compressor hasn't failed though, so no contamination in that regard.
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annually, but it will still be made. The equipment using R22 will no longer be made after 2010.

If the lines are sized properly, they shouldn't need replacement if you go back with R22. If you go with R410a, you should have them replaced.
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Do you think it would be wise to switch over to 410?
HeatMan wrote:

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The Installers I've worked with on my last two projects were pretty much in the Majority of going with the new R410a. There were a few Old Timers that tried to convince me that R410a is crap and they don't install it, though I think it was that they were not a certified R410a installer and didn't want to get up to speed. The Bigger companies and the newer companies only installed R410a. If you really wanted the R22 they would.
If you have to tear into walls and its going to cost you a bit to get it in the wall, etc, then you might want to stick with R22, if you have easy access to the lineset its not going to be that much to run a new one for the R410a
Scott<-

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Is it not the case that newly made compressors are DESIGNED to work the R410a refrigerant formula, and that using the R22 formula MAY cause damage to the compressor?
Scott Townsend wrote:

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Yes, but I think most companies are still offering both types of compressors. I haven't gotten a comparitive estimate yet for a 410 system. The guy yesterday just wrote up an estimate for an R22 system using the existing linesets. I didn't even know it was R22 until I took a closer look at the model number and the brochure. I just assumed all new systems were R410. Maybe he's trying to push an R22 system on me so as to get rid of them while he still can. For the next estimate, I will be sure to ask about an R410 system. I'm hoping it won't be much more expensive.
Robert Gammon wrote:

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Its nothing to do with the compressor(yes they are designed for specific refrigerants).... its everything to do with the incompatability of the oils and refrigerants.

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On Tue, 13 Jun 2006 14:31:10 GMT, "Scott Townsend"

Companys are driven not by what is right, but the bottom line.
Are R410a's more expensive? If so, then the profit margin would be higher.
Do the math. :p
tom

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RAJ writes:

No. R22 is superior to R410 in every physical respect. The only issue is availability of R22, which is to be artificially restricted by men with guns (i.e., the gummint), not by the market. But this is not supposed to happen for longer than your system today will last.
Go to epatest.com and get an EPA license and stock up on R-22 while it is still legal. The people who did this with R-12 in 1992 made a fortune, buying at $1/lb and reselling 5 or 10 years later for $50/lb.
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With systems already being designed for the likes of NU22, Im not sure this will be the case this time.
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wrote:

convert over to an alternative. Once 12 prices went through the roof we just converted to something else. Not a big deal.
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what you seem to be overlooking is the bazillions of existing commercial and residentail systems that DO contain R-22.
Do you think that all this gas will be vented? Burned or destroyed? Not recovered & reclaimed?
And what about the countries that havent signed on board the Montreal Protocol? I'll bet they have gazillions more systems running r-22, until hell freezes over.
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Kinda like all those vehicles with R12?

Ok...point taken...
But...
Look up NU22, from ICOR.

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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Why do you say it is superior physically? How so?

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Because he is an idiot.
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RAJ writes:

Thermodynamic efficiency. Operating pressure.
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When R22 is no longer 'availiable' your local drug smuggler will be happy to get you some.... ;)
--
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Wise? Your call.
I will NOT have R410a in my house until I have NO OTHER choice. Personal opinion.
R22 will be around for 14 more years. Before it's all gone, I think (feel, hope, pray) there will be a better choice than R410a.
And if anyone's wondering, that's the last I will say on this, so don't ask questions about why I won't have R410a in my house.

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I emailed my potential contractor (sales guy) with questions about switching over and replacing the lineset. The installation manager called me back within a short period of time and gave me some helpful info on this:
1. In a switchover, they will replace the lineset if its easy. He said the manf recomend changing the line, but that's nothing new, they've ALWAYS recomended changing the line even in the old days. 2. If its not easy (i.e., a ceiling needs to be torn up), they will only recommend a replace if they feel its necessary, i.e., if they see that oil has been trapped in there or is dripping out of the horizontal section. He said the oil usually doesn't settle in the horizontal section anyway. 3. They will do a nitrogen purge of course. He said he's heard of using a cleansing solvent as well, but said he usually doesn't use it, as it can introduce foreign substances as well into the tubing. 4. He installed a 410 in his own house because he got a good deal on it. 5. Also said he expects R22 to be around longer than either of us. American Standard's 18 SEER is R22 so obviously they expect it to be around a while. 6. The decison to switch over or not should be based more on the cost or quality of the unit rather than the particular refrigerant involved.
Well, it was a pleasure talking to a professional who took the time to explain things thoroughly. I look forward to receiving their quote in the mail.
HeatMan wrote:

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