Question regarding Kitchen Renovation - order of installation.


When renovating a kitchen using ceramic tile as flooring..... are the base cabinets installed in place and then the ceramic tile, or is the entire floor finished first and then the base cabinets put into place.
How is the dishwasher handled... if ceramic tile is installed up to the front of the dishwasher, it blocks the dishwasher in....however if tile is installed under the dishwasher... it creates problems with the countertop height.
Just curious...
Thanks in advance !!
Peter
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On Aug 18, 7:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Finish the entire floor and leave no empty spots. Then install your cabinets on top of the flooring. That solves all your problems and allows future changes to your cabinet layout without having to hunt down possibly discontinued floor tiles. Plus, putting flooring everywhere adds a measure of water resistance that is needed in any kitchen.
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mike wrote:

I believe this is very good advice. For small savings, tiling part of the floor leaves you with possibly limited choices long-term if you try to remodel. I would be sure to have extra tiles from the get-go and safeguard those. I have tile in living and dining rooms, and after living with it a few years, would not tile a kitchen floor. I love my tile, but a few spills will always be impossible to remove....we sealed ours well, and the grout is taupe, like the tile. Only two adults, and rare spills, but coffee with creamer is tough :o) We have terrazzo in kitchen, baths and hallway and I love it. Strip and reseal and shine every couple of years and it looks good for a long time. It's about 35 years old, and the only original terrazzo remaining in our condo - others have all tiled over - but it looks far better, far longer, with less care, than any other flooring I have had. Can always regrout, which I have done in our shower :o)
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Finish the entire floor and leave no empty spots. Then install your cabinets on top of the flooring. That solves all your problems and allows future changes to your cabinet layout without having to hunt down possibly discontinued floor tiles. Plus, putting flooring everywhere adds a measure of water resistance that is needed in any kitchen.
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Following your advice, I'd have spent $500+ more to tile under cabinets. How many people remodel a kitchen after 20 or 30 years and do NOT change the flooring? How many people rearrange the kitchen cabinets frequently?
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A friend's daughter recently had serious floor damage under their dishwasher because the appliance had an undetected leak and no flooring under it. If there was flooring there, it would have protected against the leak, and the leak would likely have been noticed immediately instead of pooling in a shallow pocket for who knows how long
If you ever put in new cabinets, and the whole floor is covered, you may be able to save the cost of new flooring, which is more than $500. Sometimes people want to remove a cabinet to put in a certain appliance, or to add entryway, or to expand.
How much does it cost to repair floor water damage? If it's extensive, it may even affect the cabinets themselves.
By the way, what percentage of your total floor cost did you save by cutting corners?
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A friend's daughter recently had serious floor damage under their dishwasher because the appliance had an undetected leak and no flooring under it.
If there was flooring there, it would have protected against the leak, and the leak would likely have been noticed immediately instead of pooling in a shallow pocket for who knows how long
If you ever put in new cabinets, and the whole floor is covered, you may be able to save the cost of new flooring, which is more than $500. Sometimes people want to remove a cabinet to put in a certain appliance, or to add entryway, or to expand.
How much does it cost to repair floor water damage? If it's extensive, it may even affect the cabinets themselves.
By the way, what percentage of your total floor cost did you save by cutting corners?
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There was no floor under the dishwasher? Was it a hole right through to China? What they really had was a half assed job. Flooring does not guarantee it would have been caught, but if it was sheet goods, it may have run out first. There should have been something under the DW so it can slide out, like we did on every kitchen we ever did.
Again, when doing major work like adding an entry or new cabinets, chances are, new floor is going in at the same time. Having worked on dozens of kitchen remodels, (part time job years ago), none ever saved the floor. Out with the old.. . . . . .
How much did I save? Figure it out. I had 21' of cabinet in a galley kitchen and I used Italian quarry tile. I moved out of that house some years ago and the beautiful kitchen with walnut cabinets is still intact as it stood. What a waste to put such tile and hide it under the cabinets. If the floor gets damaged in a couple of decades, the under cabinet part is just wasted.
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There was no flooring in the case of the dishwasher leak, as in tile, etc.... Ya know, just like you suggest. Just bare plywood. It was a disaster.
I can't figure out the percentage you saved on materials without knowing the overall cost. By the sounds of it, I hope you have a flooring material that will last for generations. If it'l last for generations, that makes it important to have something over the whole area that will allow for alternative layouts as well as water protection.
I have slate floor in parts of my house that look s great after nearly 50 years. I would have loved to have something like that during the last kitchen remodel. It would have eliminated flooring costs. I suspect people who rip out their floors have cheapo floors anyway, and so the added material cost would be slim to non-existant with the case of sheet flooring.
Applying flooring before also cuts labor costs which would further offset your material cost.
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I can't figure out the percentage you saved on materials without knowing the overall cost. By the sounds of it, I hope you have a flooring material that will last for generations. If it'l last for generations, that makes it important to have something over the whole area that will allow for alternative layouts as well as water protection.
I have slate floor in parts of my house that look s great after nearly 50 years. I would have loved to have something like that during the last kitchen remodel. It would have eliminated flooring costs. I suspect people who rip out their floors have cheapo floors anyway, and so the added material cost would be slim to non-existant with the case of sheet flooring.
Applying flooring before also cuts labor costs which would further offset your material cost.
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Probably save 40% or so. Lots of cabinets compared to floor space.
Your slate may last 200 years, but the next owner will probably rip in out to change the color.
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Well then, save a BUNCH of $$ and use plain ol $ 1.00 tile from a discount outlet for the unseen areas under the cabinets and D/W
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I agree putting the good flooring under cabinets is a big waste of money but they always tile or put the hardwood under the dishwasher , stove and fridge...What I've seen personally is , if it's hardwood they use the cut offs and not so pretty stuff and with tile they use chipped , cutoffs or left over tile from another area or other job to do under the cabinets mostly for spacers and is not filled in totally......Best of both worlds....
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

There are pros and cons.
Installing UP TO the edge of things: * Easier to do * Problems with remodeling or replacement of things not exactly like the things being replaced
Diswasher: * Raise the cabinets * Remove completely the adjustable legs. That should gain you another 3/8" or so.
I hope others have some suggestions - I don't like anything so far.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

If you don't tile under, the simplest thing to do with a dishwasher is to set it on wood/ply strips the same thickness as the tile. Unless your counters are lower than normal, there should be no problem with clearance to the counter top.
--

dadiOH
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Cabinets first, but put them on some material about the same thickness as the tile, especially the dishwasher. If you are using cheap flooring, you can put it first, but if you are using expensive tile, why waste a few hundred bucks under the cabinets?
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