quartz vs granite counter tops

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Other than having to apply a sealer to granite what is the difference between granite and quartz?
Thanks!!
Eddie G
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So-called quartz is, in reality, plastic. With colorant and crushed quartz gravel added to the mix. My neighbor had Dupont Zodiaq installed. Lasted just 2 years, then it faded due to sunlight, and began to decompose on the surface, leaving holes. Looked crappy, even at the start.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Granite is a natural stone. It consists of numerous minerals including quartz, feldspar, augite, horneblend, etc. Some are hard, others not particularly. It is held together by the interlocking of the crystal structure of the various minerals. Won't burn/scorch.
"Quartz" is a man made material with - IMO - a deceptive name. It consists of grains of various minerals including quartz. Despite the name, many of the minerals must not be quartz as quartz (except for some special types) is transparent. The minerals are held together with some type of binder - acrylic, epoxy...like that. Basically, it is no different from other man made solid surface materials like Corian. Will burn/scorch.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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wrote:

This might explain something to me. Why tombstones only come from certain quarries. Can I assume that those are the ones where the granite has very little not-hard stuff?
One places is Barre, Vermont, and I think in the East there is another place in Kentucky or Tennessee. I've seen granite tombstones (and buildings) that are more than 100 years old and look good as new.
OTOH marble used to be used much more, but acid rain makes it dissolve. Did it wear away even before the 20th century?
Do they still use as much marble in other parts of the counttry, where there is (afaI have heard) no acid rain?

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--WebTV-Mail-21617-7130 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
surprise to me....when visiting my sisterinlaw in the Chicago area she said she was soooo sorry for choosing Corian.
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wrote:

I forgot to mention that I am referring to counter tops, but you figured that out. I thought quartz is safe to put hot pans on without it burning.
So, I should get granite and seal it yearly? Is the sealer easy to apply? Does it smell?
Thanks,
Eddie G
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Google for Aqua Mix or 511 Impregnator
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Eddie G wrote:

It is held together with some sort of plastic material. Know of any plastics that won't burn? _________________

It's your house, get what you want. All I was trying to do was explain the differtence between granite and "Quartz" when the latter referred to a man made product.
To confuse you further :) there is another natural rock which is superior to granite or other granitic stones in some ways; namely, soapstone. It is quite soft (talc) but is impermeable. The softness means it will scratch easily but also means it is easily repaired if the scratches bother one. Most of it is naturally medium to dark grey, some is green. A wipe with mineral oil turns the grey to black. Expensive, runs around $50/sq.ft. Overpriced IMO.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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"It is held together with some sort of plastic material. Know of any plastics that won't burn? "
At the temps we are talking about for a reasonably hot pan, there are plastics that won't melt or burn. Just look at the plastic trays that some frozen foods come in that can withstand an oven. Or the plastic bags sold to put a turkey inside and then cook it in the oven. _________________
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Yes, hundreds of them. Many plastics are oven safe to 500 degrees.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Don't set a cigarette on them...temp is 700+ to 1100+. Not hard to get a skillet to the 700-800+ range either.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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dadiOH wrote:

They're held together with epoxies. Epoxy binders can be engineered to be extremely hard and strong. They may be plastic (as in malleable) when formulated, but once cured (or whatever process the engineered countertop material is put through) they develop their strength.
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Hardness isn't really an issue. Heat resistance is.
According to my research, epoxy-bonded silestone (and Zodiaq) are relatively heat resistant - better than corian or plastic laminate - but the epoxies will burn or discolor if hot enough.
However, I get the impression that silestone and zodiaq are repairable to a certain extent, and we don't put hot pots on counters anyway.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote: ....

Aside from the tests already mentioned, you can drop a lit match on Silestone, let it burn, and it won't hurt the countertop at all. All you have to do is wipe off combustion residue from the match.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Yes, I've seen test results that show no effect of placing lit cigarettes on these engineered countertops, vs staining for granite. These are on manufacturer sites, so take it FWIW.
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Nexus7 wrote:

Actually, I've done this myself many times. I don't have to take the manufacturer's word for it. It's no problem.
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You think this is an adequate simulation of placing a 500F+ pot on it?
It isn't.
Epoxy isn't heat proof. In fact, most break down well below 500F.
The amount of heat that a lit match produces could well be adequately dissipated by the quartz to keep the binder below breakdown temperature. But I certainly expect that not to be true with something considerably larger.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

Um, if you were keeping up with this thread, you'd see that I did test it with extremely hot pans. (Again, no problem)
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 20:40:02 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

The heat-resistance specification for silestone is as follows:
"Silestone is heat resistant up to 200C. It is recommended for use in splashbacks and around stove tops. It is NOT, however recommended that hot pans or pots be placed directly on the Silestone surface."
FWIW, that translates to around 400F.
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Chris Lewis wrote:

Yep....words to live by :)
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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