PVC Cement on CPVC Pipe 1/2"


I inadvertently used PVC cement on some 1/2" CPVC pipe that feeds a toilet supply. It held and it appears well sealed. Will this be a problem?
Thanks, Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ianjones wrote:

they make cpvc cement? I thought it was all pvc cement......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I saw it at Lowe's when I was picking something else up - the piece I was replacing had a colored dried liquid that isn't clear like PVC cement. It could be same stuff - different packaging - at least I hope so.
Tater wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know if there is any actual differance in the stuff in the can, but it is sold as CPVC cement by the lable on the can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

There are 3 different basic types and variations within the groups. PVC CPVC UNIVERSAL that can be used on both.
I have used muchly of all three types. Yes there is a difference in formulation but I can't say what happens when the wrong one is used.
Then of course there is ABS....
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used some 3 years ago on about 6 joints, and it hasn't leaked yet. For what that's worth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I made the same mistake a while ago. so far no leaks.
ianjones wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

PVC solvent is usually clear or blue.
CPVC solvent is usually orange.
The primer is usually purple.
From what I've read, this lets inspectors see at a glance whether you used the primer (required by code for PVC and CPVC), and whether you used the appropriate solvent for the type of pipe you have.
Other than color, I don't know if there's any difference in the two types of solvents. But, I would tend to think so since there is only one type of primer, but two types of solvents.
If the pipe and fittings are still accessable, I think I would cut it out and redo it. The pipe and fittings are extremely cheap compared to the damage that a water leak could cause.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

OOPS. I may have used primer, but if I didn't, am I off the hook: The only plastic pipes I have fiddled with are the sump pump output, the AC condensate drain, and the water heater leak-into-the-sump pipe.
Does that part of the code doesn't apply to any of those things?
BTW, I wanted to add pipes to my black sump pump pipe, but now all I see is white pipe. Is that what I'm supposed to use?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The primer is only needed for the white PVC pipe and the cream colored CPVC pipe. You don't need to use primer with black ABS pipes.
Having said that, I have glued up many PVC fittings for small projects without using the primer. While it's not recommended, you can still get a good connection without primer. There's just a greater chance of having a leak. The primer simply cleans oils and dirt off the pipe and softens it a little to help the solvent work better.

PVC pipe (the white stuff) is popular in some areas, while ABS (the black stuff) is popular in other areas. I like PVC better, even though it's harder to find in my area, but that's just my personal preference.
I haven't seen your sump pump pipe, so I don't know if it's ABS or flexible black poly pipe. ABS is hard, straight, and rigid with glued fittings. The poly pipe is somewhat flexible and is usually connected with pipe clamps at each fitting.
Assuming you have ABS pipe, you might want to check other stores in your area, especially small mom and pop hardware stores. If ABS was once popular in your area, odds are you can still find it locally somewhere.
Otherwise, just pick up a couple of rubber "fernco" couplers and switch to PVC pipe for all future work. All typical homecenter stuff.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

OK, great. (Although only the sump was black. The AC condensate was cream and the water heater overflow was white, but the latter pipe was brand new and not dirty, and the other stuff I probably idd use the primer. I know I have some and I've used it!hat

Yeah, I have the rigid black abs

I was raised to believe that white pipes shouldn't mate with black pipes. I'm driving from Baltimore to Texas and back early spring. Maybe I'll make a tour of the hardware stores until I find what I need. (I'd better make a list now!)
Thanks a lot.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The purple primer seems to last forever, but the solvents usually "gel" up after several months once they have been opened. So even when I had a big project like plumbing our house, I prefer to buy the smaller cans of solvent (usually about $2 each). I'll usually get two or three small cans instead of a single big one. If the first one gel's up, I can open a new can.
The one exception is when doing larger drain pipes 2" and up. The larger cans have larger applicators which work better for the larger pipes. But, you also tend to use more solvent with the larger pipes too.

Red (copper) and Yellow (brass), Black (ABS) and White (PVC) are just another type of pipe. Embrace the new world... You can mate any pipe with any other pipe these days. :)

I wouldn't make a special trip for supplies like that. It's easy enough to switch to a different pipe if ABS isn't available in your area. Besides, you'll undoubtedly forget a part you need, or make a mistake during installation and have to redo it. :)
Or, you could order the parts you need online from a place like:
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/absplasticfittings.html
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None of these pipes are hot water pipes... and none are constantly pressurized. You should be fine, even if you used bamboo instead of pipe. ;-) I don't even have a water heater over-pressure valve pipe on mine...namely because if it does blow, I'm screwed just as much either way.
Your AC drain has no pressure at all, unless it clogs with mold or something. In which case, the cement on the pipe is the least of your worries.
also, CPVC is usually used for hot water. PVC works just fine for cold water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check this out to really appreciate pressure relif valves.
http://www.waterheaterblast.com /
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/33094_boom28.shtml
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Berkshire Bill wrote:

uh... how does a piece of pvc prevent what is described in your articles?
and I quote: "Water heaters are equipped with pressure-relief valves -- typically placed on the top of the heat. The valves are designed to open immediately to relieve pressure if steam builds up in the heaters.
Although rare, pressure explosions of water heaters do occur.
In 1993, for example, a 40-year-old water heater exploded in a home in South St. Paul, Minn. The 200-pound tank shot through a floor, ceiling and roof like a missile.
The explosion shot the heater 150 feet in the air. It destroyed the home, slightly injured two people and killed the family beagle."
And the link to the picture is from a promo video for the relief device...it's from the 30's IIRC, I've seen it on TV a few times. Very old video.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I must be missing something there. How does a piece of PVC pipe enter into it? I saw nothing in the report about it preventing an exploseion or in the thread leading up to your post. Could have missed it but...
The only function a PVC pipe would have would be to direct the TPR discharge to someplace IAW code.
I saw the results of a steam explosion in my neighbors house. He resurrected an old wood cookstove and put it in his basement. It had a pipe coil to heat water and must have had a bit of water still in it. Capping the pipes was a mistake. Couldn't have been much water as the damage was mostly to ceiling and few chips in the concrete walls. Sstill had shrapnel everywhere.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16 Jan 2007 09:52:13 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Doesn't ABS stand for athyl-bamboo-silicate?

You're right.

Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When we plumbed our house, we were required to install a drain line from the pressure relief valve to an area outside the house. It was against code to just leave it exposed, or even to direct it to the drip pan (also required by code, and had to have it's own drain to outside as well).
Pressure valves can open if the pressure build-up in the tank gets too high, or they just leak sometimes. If the valve is working correctly, the tank should never explode. But, you could still have some serious water damage if the drain isn't plumbed somewhere where it's safe to drain.
Also, you're "supposed" to test the pressure valves once a year or so to make sure the valve doesn't get stuck. That's why they have the little lever on them. Lift the lever to flush out the valve and piping, then let it close again. If it doesn't open or leaks afterwards, it's time to replace the valve.

I thought I had read somewhere that PVC was no longer allowed for supply lines in a home? I used CPVC for both hot and cold, and PVC for all underground lines running to the pump and various buildings.
Using all CPVC also had practical benefits. I could stock up on pipe fittings of a single type instead of needing PVC fittings for cold and CPVC fittings for hot. I also only needed the CPVC solvent.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It was inside a wall and I have already closed it up with new drywall - I guess I have done this a couple times elsewhere and so far so good. I will make sure and get the proper solvent and cement for future projects.
HerHusband wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you haven't painted yet, I'd still cut out the drywall and redo it. Drywall is cheap, maybe $5 for a full sheet?
But, if you've already painted, put trim and cabinets in place, etc. I guess you'll just have to hope for the best. It's probably highly unlikely you would have any problems in the future anyway. The solvents work by "melting" (or welding) the plastic together. Once it sets up, if it doesn't leak now, I doubt it will leak in the future. But, you'll always have that question in the back of your mind... :)
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.