Propane vs. Nat. Gas

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I live in a rural area currently with electric only. No pun intended. There are rumors of nat. gas coming soon, but who knows when. We want a gas stove. Am considering propane. I have a propane stove at the cabin and it works fine. Heats fast, bakes good. We don't use it a lot, not nearly as much as we would at the primary house.
For those who have/have had both propane and natural gas, is it worth it to wait for the natural gas, or just do the propane thing. And then convert when it gets there if we choose to?
I certainly like propane for grilling, but can't compare as I have never used nat. for outdoor cooking. Is there a big difference in that?
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

... First, _why_ do you want the gas stove/range? That should determine whether you're willing to wait or not.
Propane probably won't be any cheaper than the electric, might even be more expensive depending on just how high LP is where you are as compared to the electric rates.
The "chef" reasons for gas are immaterial one to the other imo (and, not being particularly culinary, mostly overrated), but those are choices only possible to be made on the basis of personal preference and/or prejudice.
--
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If you don't cook, how can you offer an opinion?
Gas cooks better. Electric sucks. Go to any restaurant and see if they use electricity or gas.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Actually, they each have their benefits. I have dual fuel, which is really the best of both, with gas burners up top, and electric convection main and electric side ovens below.
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wrote:

Hi Pete,
Initially, I wasn't too thrilled that my range was dual fuel, but it's turned out to be the better choice afterall now that propane is more expensive than electricity (at least locally) and because no combustion by-products are released into the room. The one drawback for me is that the forty amp breaker steals space in main panel that could be used for other purposes; at this point, I have one slot remaining.
Cheers, Paul
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wrote:

Hi Pete,
I have a 100-amp main panel with 32 half height breakers, but no means to add a sub panel (finished area). I'd like to add a second ductless heat pump to serve the basement level and it seems my best option is to terminate the range cable in the laundry room and install a pony panel that will serve both loads; given the oven is 5,200-watts, there should be enough capacity for them to happily co-exist.

As you say, better temperature control is supposedly one key advantage, although I can't honestly say I've noticed any difference.
Cheers, Paul
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"Paul M. Eldridge" wrote:

A finished area doesn't mean you can't add a sub panel. Indeed if you couldn't add a sub, how could you install new circuits to use up the remaining space in the current panel? It's just a bit more work to fish wires around, and a little less fun.

Capacity is a function of the wire gauge, so you'd need to verify what it's wired with. If it's a newer installation, the range feed should be four wire which is what you'd need for a sub panel. If it's older three wire then you can't repurpose it as a sub panel feed.

It depends on the cooking you do as to how much you'd notice it, but I certainly noticed that when I cook on electric I frequently have to physically lift a pan off the burner when I turn it down since it will take several seconds before the electric coil begins to cool vs. the instant change in flame level with gas. Minor for small pans, but a real pain for big heavy stuff, or when you are multitasking several burners and can't spare the time to hold the pan in the air.
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wrote:

Well, I could add a sub panel but it would mean ripping out drywall and re-framing, which is something I'd like to avoid if possible. During the renovation phase, I pulled an extra 15-amp circuit to the attic and this last slot is intended to feed this line should it ever be required.

Good question. I believe the cable, which is now forty years old, contains a black, red, white and ground, but I'd have to check this to be sure. As to its gage, I can't imagine an issue, given that it was installed at the time the house was built and presumably by a qualified electrican and to code.

Sorry, I should have been more clear -- only with respect to the oven portion and not the gas cook top.
Cheers, Paul
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Then you haven't cooked very much. With gas, it's on or it's off. Or it's on just a little. Or it's on a lot. You can visually look at it and see what it's doing.

The perfect description of why many cooks like gas over electric. You must have a different kind of electric stove than I. When I turn mine down, it takes a LOT longer than "several seconds" to cool off. Sometimes it takes until the food starts to burn, or is seriously overcooked.
For me, the OP, there is no question re: gas vs. electric. Gas wins out. I was mainly wondering how people compare the two gases.
Steve
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wrote:

I realize gas ovens cycle on and off (as do electric) and greater variation in cooking temperature is possible (or so I'm told), but having used both I've never found it to be a problem. Perhaps some models have more accurate controls than others, or maybe newer ranges in general work better than their older counterparts -- I really don't know. All I can tell you is that I've never had reason to complain.
And for those less fortunate, help might be found here:
http://www.ehow.com/how_8260_check-adjust-ovens.html
Cheers, Paul
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"Paul M. Eldridge" wrote:

From what I've seen, electric ovens tend to have better controls than gas ovens do. Dual fuel is the way to go whether it's a dual fuel range, or a gas cooktop and electric wall ovens.
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Have that combo of gas cooktop, electric oven in one of my houses now, and love it. Will do it again on this remodel. The prices and availability of stand alone gas wall ovens is high, and the venting/ducting is VERY different cost and code wise.
Steve
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Ovens can vary wildly simply by their configuration. Placement of air channels. Thickness and types of metals. Size and shape of burners. Lots of things. Ovens are a different animal. I'm mainly talking about burners. What you see is what you get. And once you get used to it, you can set it instantly, and it doesn't take it ten minutes to finally adjust to that new temperature setting.
It's a coin flip with electric vs. gas ovens.
And I think there's a huge difference with ovens, just like burners. A person who bakes a lot will be better at setting, maintaining, and recognizing temperatures than the occasional baker.
Steve
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wrote:

Hi Steve,
I fully agree with you with regards to the cook top; no question, gas provides much better control. My comments were strictly with respect to the oven portion and, again, I've never had any issues with accuracy or temperature control with either gas or electric. Chalk it up to either low culinary standards or extraordinary good luck. :-)
If I had access to natural gas, I would opt for an all gas unit, if for no other reason than to free up space on my main [100-amp] panel. However, as I'm currently restricted to either propane and/or electric, a dual fuel range is my preferred option. An all electric would be a distant third.
Cheers, Paul
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SteveB wrote: ...

I simply asked -- if you're one of those who thinks that way, then that should be your deciding factor imo...I personally don't happen to think it makes a heck of a lot of difference, but for those who do, go for it...
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dpb wrote:

Having spent quite a bit of time cooking on both electric and gas at different houses, it is entirely possible to cook good meals on either. Having gas burners makes some tasks easier, and makes a few tasks possible such a stir fry where few if any electric stoves have sufficient heat output to work properly (even low end gas stoves aren't adequate).
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I actually have both in my kitchen. The gas truly excels at everything except when you need to gently simmer something on low heat. I have a two burner electric range built into the counter for that one function. For everything else, I'm cookin' with GAS.
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yep a 100 pound LP tank and stove with conversion parts on hand to convert when NG becomes available..........
they did this on a ask this old house recently
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Apparently you DON'T cook, like you said. Serious cooking cannot be accomplished on an electric stove.
s

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"S. Barker" wrote:

Yes it can, but an electric stove limits some of your options. Gas is vastly preferable of course.
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