Propane Refrigerators

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Do propane refrigerators need to be vented outside? I have just bought a cabin with a Consul 17 cubic foot fridge/freezer.
The burner needed cleaning, as it smelled very very rich. It had a lot of soot. When I put it back together, the diffuser fell down into the exhaust pipe, and I didn't notice it.
When it started smelling again, I checked it, and cleaned it again.
Tell me of your experiences with propane appliances in an enclosed space. I know they can be lethal, but this has a very small burner. Nothing in the instructions mentioned outside venting.
Steve
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Mine isn't vented; I don't recall the instructions mentioning it.
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As well with my instructions. NO mention of venting. A Google check with a propane refrigerator manufacturer's FAQs says "if it is functioning properly", it needs no venting.
I know that carbon monoxide is bad stuff, so, just wanted to ask people about their experiences.
Steve
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Don't know a thing about propane refrigerators. However, if you feel uncomfortable about it not being vented. I'd vent it. The value of peace of mind might exceed the cost of your worry. A good friend of mine from college lost a cousin due to a gas leak. He slept through the ordeal. I think it was propane he was using somewhere in his house. Sorry, don't remember the specifics.
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On 09/06/05 09:54 pm Charlie S. tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

I'm assuming that they work on a similar principle to the kerosene refrigerators I recall from a few decades back; a neighbor in a rural area of UK with no electric supply had one. Some of those used ammonia as the refrigerant, but maybe the propane ones now use Freon.
IIRC, the heat of the flame raises the pressure of the refrigerant just as the compressor does in an electric refrigerator.
Perce
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.

IIRC, the flame boils the ammonia, it condenses, and as it does, cools, hence, cooling. I know the large ice producing companies around the turn of the century were ammonia powered. NO moving parts.
Steve
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Oh for heaven's sake! When things condense they give off heat; so why would it cool by condensing? http://www.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm
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I don't know. If you are so smart, why don't you post the answer instead of just coming up with contentious posts? Explain it to us stupid unwashed rabble.
An ammonia refrigerator has a flame and ammonia. I don't really understand how it works, only that it does. A flame would seem to boil a liquid, and a condensing coil would seem to condense that vapor. Just an observation by this untrained person.
If things give off heat when they condense, why isn't rain hot? Just a question from this stupid person who obviously doesn't understand and know as much as you.
Steve
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On Tue 06 Sep 2005 09:53:02p, SteveB wrote in alt.home.repair:

Why not learn how instead of remaining ignorant?
http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm
http://www.thenaturalhome.com/gasappliances.htm
--
Wayne Boatwright **
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On Tue 06 Sep 2005 09:53:02p, SteveB wrote in alt.home.repair:

Probably more than you wanted to know:
http://www.nh3tech.org/absorption.html
As a side note, some of the earliest commercial air conditioning systems used ammonia, the heat usually being supplied by a natural gas burner. These systems pre-dated sykstems uning Freon. These were generally rather large systems, installed in office buildings and theaters.
When I was a kid, my dad worked in an office building cooled by such a system. In the area of the actual equipment in the basement, there were often small leaks and one could faintly smell the ammonia.
The earliest refrigerators also used ammonia (Freon hadn't been invented yet). Many were fueled by natural gas. However, kerosene and butane (pre- dating propane) adaptations were also common in rural areas without electric power.
Even today, especially in Amish areas and other rural areas without electricity, kerosene refrigerators are used by many people.
These systems are virtually silent, although you might occasionally here a sound similar to a percolator. There is no motor or compressor. They also do a very good job of cooling and freezing.
Prices are high, most likely, because of the relatively low production compared to traditional refrigerators.
HTH
--
Wayne Boatwright **
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I shouldn't have to explain it. Some reason you can't read the perfectly clear link I provided you (for those of you too stupid to know how to use google.)

Okay, you seem to understand it; when you add heat to ammonia, it changes from a liquid to a gas. When you condense it, it gives off that very same heat. How could giving off heat cool a refrigerator? Wouldn't it heat the refrigerator? (Hint; is the compressor of your A/C the inside or outside unit.)
If you are a troll, you are a very good one. If you are not a troll, you have to try thinking.
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I just prefer when people explain things plainly and briefly. I am one year postaccident on a traumatic brain injury, and my thinking is not what it used to be.
Ergo, I ask questions, and hope that the reader can provide brief plain answers instead of sending one to a huge website where the needed data is buried in layers of advertisements. This was not the case in your citing. The site you sent me to explained it right out front. Not so in many cases. And then, there is the mail one gets when visiting random Google hits.
Plain questions only require plain answers. Not contentious argumentative superiority complex rhetoric.
Steve
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wrote

Gosh, don't I feel 2" tall! Oh, but wait a moment. If my link was appropriate, why are you hassling me? You just couldn't bother to follow it, and wanted me to repeat it all in a posting? No, I feel 6' again.
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wrote

This is Turtle.
Toller , It's hard to be humble when your perfect in everyway !
TURTLE
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TRY THIS LINK
http://www.nh3tech.org/absorption.html
Stretch
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> Plain questions only require plain answers. Not contentious argumentative

This is Turtle.
Stretch has here a very good sight to look the system up.
TURTLE
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No, completely different principle.
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On 09/06/05 11:14 pm Toller tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

Yes, I see that you are correct and that I apparently did not pay sufficient attention in physics class all those years ago -- or, of course, that my memory is . . .
Now what was I saying? :-)
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Look up "absorbtion cycle" (I never really understood this one when I took Thermodynamics in college.) They typically run on ammonia and water, or water and litium bromide.
-Bob
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It uses a tiny little flame. I get a month on a 20lb tank.
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