Problem with cigarette smoke

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I wonder if we can make tail pipe sucking a fad, and kill off a few worthless eaters?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Sorry pal, I've never sucked on a tailpipe and never intend to. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

I never heard of anybody dying from an allergy to cigarette smoke. I couldn't find any link to that info. Got a link?
Hank
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On 3/7/2012 9:00 AM, Hank wrote:

    Neither have I, (though it seems strange at this late date to have to prove that smoking is unhealthy).     A quick search turned up articles, mostly in journals that require registration or subscription payment to view. Most focus on infants and elderly. One dealt with contact dermatitis in response to cigarette smoke.     But the bigger problem (and the one that seems to be documented) deal not with direct allergy, but exacerbation of illness in people who have medical conditions (eg. triggering asthma attacks which may be life-threatening, people with cardiopulmonary disease, etc.).     I sometimes start to feel sympathetic to smokers, who it seems these days can't indulge their habit almost anywhere. But the rapidly increasing body of evidence of health effects of second-hand smoke are making this more than a simple situation of personal freedom.     I've certainly inhaled my share of second-hand smoke. My dad smoked heavily for about 35 years. I remember getting carsick as a kid as he smoked while driving. Although he is still living, he has lost a lobe of his right lung to cancer.
Steve
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Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
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On 3/7/2012 10:06 AM, Steven Bornfeld wrote:

I don't deny the hazards of smoking cigarettes, BUT...people really,really obsess about it while they ignore entirely (and to their peril) all the other s--- dumped in the air and water. There used to be a website to look up the polluters by zip code and find out the type and amount of pollutants they put out. A cozy fire in the fireplace will kill someone, too.
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If I didn't have my radon fan on, I could add the effect of smoking an additional two packs a day, or more.
Greg
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Hyperbolic bullshit.
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On 3/7/2012 6:38 PM, Norminn wrote:

    I don't know what "people" you're talking to--but they must be different people.     It is probably true that radon, probably the second most important cause of lung cancer isn't given the attention it deserves (in most parts of the country). Otherwise air quality has improved markedly over the years--probably on account of we don't manufacture much anymore--and restrictions on coal.     Water is another story, of course, though the adoption of unleaded gasoline improved things for some.     But I'm not giving smokers a free pass here, and while I have some sympathy to all addicts, it doesn't grant a license to assault others.
Steve
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Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
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wrote:

I can sit by a fire - open campfire of fireplace, with no problems at all, and I like the smell of woodsmoke from a fire on a cool night - but a whiff of tobacco smoke - particularly from a Menthol cigarette, and I develop breathing problems almost immediately. Just got back from a week in Austria and 2 weeks on an Italian cruise liner and it'll take a few weeks to get back to normal breathing. And for me, antihistamines DO help - to an extent, so I think it is safe to call it an "allergy" and not just sensitivity.
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cut To start with, produce some positive pressure in your home, to stop the polluted air from coming into the house. A ventilator sucking outside air would do that.
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Excellent idea! Keep em coming.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
To start with, produce some positive pressure in your home, to stop the polluted air from coming into the house. A ventilator sucking outside air would do that.
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On 3/6/2012 2:11 PM, Sjouke Burry wrote:

    Several people have mentioned this, and it makes sense. Especially given the (non) winter we've had here.
Thanks, Steve
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Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
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On 3/6/2012 5:25 PM, Steven Bornfeld wrote:

One simple measure that comes to mind is weatherstripping around doors...are entrances close to each other, such that your exhaust fan could pull air from their residence that way?
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Probably best to open the common wall inspect for holes which could provide a fire path, and spray foam everything with closed cell foam. this would cut your heating bills too. R6.4 per inch
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On 3/6/2012 9:42 PM, bob haller wrote:

When the wall was open, there were no visible holes. We DID want our contractor to insulate the wall. Ironically, our intent was noise abatement, not smoke. But ultimately it wasn't done.
Steve
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wrote:

Will only help heating bills if the other side of the house is unheated.
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On 3/6/2012 9:11 PM, Norminn wrote:

Entrances ARE close to each other, and doors leading to the back yard are fairly close too. But I'm pretty sure it's not coming in that way, except through the walls--and as others have pointed out, running the exhaust fan (which we do very sparingly) could be creating a negative net pressure and encouraging leakage through the wall. But we haven't been using the exhaust fans much at all.
Steve
--
Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
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On 3/7/2012 9:51 AM, Steven Bornfeld wrote:

I seriously doubt that smoke travels THROUGH the walls, but easily through small gaps between structural members. Just caulking baseboards and plumbing/elect. openings should help.
An example of fumes traveling: our condo was being pressure washed using a gas compressor. AC intake was at the opposite end of the building. We had an old and forgotten CO detector in our laundry room. The CO detector went off! Only entry possible at the time was under closed front doors.
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wrote:

I agree with Paul. Check the attic. Hopefully the wall extends past the roof line (fire stop). Other places to seal would be electrical outlets. If all else fails, positive pressure in your side will keep any odors, cool air, warm air and etc. from entering your space. This can be done with a small fan if located properly. The location of your house/apt in regards to wind direction and such will affect the performance, so placing the fan is critical.
Holding something that smokes ( like a cigarette) around different places will help you determine where the odor is entering.
Good luck and happy hunting.
If all else fails, bring home some Nitrous Oxide and have her take a few hits. LOL
Hank
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On 3/6/2012 1:25 PM, Hank wrote:

    The outlets--that's something to try (though I wouldn't think that much air would pass through them.     Nitrous might help. ;-)
Steve
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Hank, they are trying to keep the cig smoke out, not make their own!
I've seen electrical outlet "foams" for sale.
I'd also still be looking for a way to make your side positive pressure. Perhaps a cold air intake for the return side of your furnace.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 3/6/2012 1:25 PM, Hank wrote:

The outlets--that's something to try (though I wouldn't think that much air would pass through them. Nitrous might help. ;-)
Steve
--
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