Portable compressors

I want to get one of the new small wall mount/portable compressors. Sears and CH both make oil-free and oil-lubricated models for about the same money ($100). This will only be used for occasional brad/nailer, tire inflation, air nozzle, etc.
What should I look for? Is oil-lube more durable than oil-free?
Thanks.
Sears: http://tinyurl.com/6agnn http://tinyurl.com/5su96
CH Ironforce: http://tinyurl.com/7y7yu
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David
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yes, oil lube will last much longer.
bill

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I got this one at harbor freight for the same occasional use as you've mentioned (I have a full size one in the garage, but it's nice to have one you can tote around the house for nailing up trim, etc). Oil type, 4 gallon tank, 125 psi max. Haven't used it too much so far, but it seems to run my nailer, 1/2" impact wrench, air ratchet etc just fine. I did add a regulator to it (I had one, but you can get one at HF to add for a few bucks). For $90 it's hard to go wrong.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber8898
Dan
bill a wrote:

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on 12/10/2004 1:55 PM Dan said the following:

Dan, do you know how many amps that unit draws?
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David
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I looked at the unit & original box, to my surprise it doesn't say. Can't find the booklet that came w/it. There's a formula for calculating watts based on HP rating (2) divide watts by rated volts (115) to get current, I don't know what it is off the top of my head. Email HF, they could probably tell you. I know I have not had any trouble running it on 15-20 amp household outlets. Box says it weighs 51#, if that's of importance. I think it's a nice unit, seems well made enough. Chinese, as most if not all would be in this price range.
Dan
DJA wrote:

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Greetings,
I purchased an oil-free and it froze up on me after less than two years of use. I do not know if this is typical but it was my experience.
Hope this helps, William
PS: Is there any way to oil an oil-free compressor? I still have it.

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I used an oil free on a 6 year aircraft construction project. I drilled something like 14,000 holes, deburred and/or countersunk 56,000 hole sides (at least), used a cut-off tool a bunch, and primed and painted every piece of the aircraft. In addition, I used the same compressor for a power nailer while building a very detailed 450' privacy fence and on various other projects. After 10 years, the compressor is still running fine.
I'm sure lots of variables impact the quality and durability of a compressor. The big difference (IMO) between oiled and oil-less compressors is the noise. Oil-less compressors are LOUD, but you can either build an enclosure, or deal with the noise if it is an occasional use tool.
KB
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Campbell Hausfeld is a good brand. Get oil-lubricated with a cast iron pump--they last longer provided the unit is maintained properly.
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I have had a Campbell Hausfield unit for about 15 years and it still works fine. It doesn't get a lot of use but it sits unused in the basement and sometimes that can be just as bad as not using a tool. I use it for inflation of tires and air mattresses, maintaining my pressure tank, blowing out pipes and hoses, spray painting, blowing out dust and whatever. It's a handy tool to have. I'm not sure if it is oil free or not. But it has worked well with essentially no TLC. ds

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I bought an oiless-tankless $100 job for the same light occasional use. Without the tank, there is no accumulation so the peak output is severely limited. I bought a small tank for about $25 + tube + Gauge + fittings with considerable improvment but still a Micky-Mouse sorry arrangement.
In retrospect I should have bought a oiled portable unit with tank for about $250. Repeatedly learning my lesson to buy quality tools or at least one grade above the lowest.
MG
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on 12/11/2004 9:28 AM MG said the following:

Yep. I can't tell you how many times I've done the same thing. I end up buying twice because I tried to save a buck the first time.
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Get an oil lube unit. (they last longer and are quieter then direct drive).
Hitachi makes a good one.

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