Pool / hot tub question

We're shopping for a new pool and hot tub (1st time) and someone told my DW to avoid getting the two right next to each other - to put the hot tub a few feet away. Is there any good reason to do this?
Can anyone recommend a good pool contractor they've used in the Clermont, Florida area?
TIA
JustDave
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had a hot tub adjacent to our pool. When the filter for the pool ran it had to empty the hot tub water into the pool as part of the circulation plan. Thus, we would lose all of the hot water to the pool. We seldom used it because we had to take time to heat the tub from scratch every time which took an hour or so to do. You could heat the tub and save it for the next use but then you couldn't run the pool filter. A real pain.
Tom G.
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wrote:

them separately or share water. That way you are only maintaing one body of water when you are not using the spa
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plumbed right.
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wrote:

but it is worth it with the price of energy. When you are not using the spa it is good to be able to swap water but once the spa is hot you want to be able to keep it turning over separately. Solar is also starting to make a lot of sense so think about that too.
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The thing is to make them separate units. A spa/pool combo has common plumbing, thus, some water exchange. I have seen spas that cascade/waterfall into the pool. Lots of heated water going into the pool.
It will cost a lot less to have the spa heated by itself, as spas only have about 400 gallons or so. They are insulated, and have covers. Typically, spas are also not used during the hot months. Pools are. Having them totally separated and isolated will save you energy costs.
Now, as to whether cosmetically you want to have them close together, that's up to you. Just remember that a spa has electricity and circuits in it, and putting it close to 35,000 gallons of water has its hazards. In this case, huddle with the pool and spa guys to make a safe combination if you want them close to one another.
Steve, who has two spas and one pool.
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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 12:38:10 -0700, "Steve B"

If it is plumbed right you only pump pool water into the spa causing it to overflow when you are not heating the spa. You have 2 ways to go. Pool and spa separate, and pool pumping into spa, making them share water. We don't use the spa in the summer, why maintain two water systerms? Just turn the spa over with the pool and keep the pool right.
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snip snip
Just an aside ......... I have solar heating. When I want to drain the spa to put in new water, I pump out into the pool. Then, to fill, I draw water from the pool, which is about 85 degrees, and not 60 as comes out of the tap to fill the spa. That converts to five hours less of heating, as my spa heats at 5 degrees an hour when refilling.
Steve
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