Pool Heaters:

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Anyone have any pool heater info they wanna share with me?
Wifey has been lobbying for a heater and is armed with her mother's chequebook. In the interest of staying married I've caved in and decided that a heater might be a good thing for our kids... I just agreed to this 15 minutes ago, so haven't Googled anything yet.
Pool dimensions are 16 x 32 x 10 feet deep (3 feet at shallow end).
Ontario Canada. Typically our water is heated by the sun to 23 or 24, which I think is 76F. In hot days it can get to 80F. Want a heater that will give us 29 to 30 which I think is 85F but if not, at least to maintain 80F.
Natural gas. Chlorine, Sand filter.
One other question, are these things power vent or pvc exhaust or are they stack exhaust? Want to keep indoors but wonder about air breathing.
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On Wednesday, August 15, 2012 1:12:05 PM UTC-7, Duesenberg wrote:

My advice is install a flow switch on the water line; do not trust the thermostatic safety switch it never works right.
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On 8/15/2012 1:12 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

solar?
it'll cost a fortune for any reasonable sized pool to heat it more than a couple of weeks/year.
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On 8/15/2012 1:12 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

A heated pool is a system. A pool heat source is a PART of that system. If the mother's checkbook includes paying for the heat, your system gets simpler. If you're paying, you might want to do a LOT of research on the financial implications of a heated pool.
There are floating pool covers that absorb more heat from the sun and prevent some of the radiation. Keeping the heat in is as important as adding more heat. This is especially important if you expect 85 degree water in the winter.
You can calculate the volume of the pool and how many BTU's it takes to get from 76 to 85F. From then on it's all about losses. Minimize those losses.
Solar collectors can be very useful. You might decide that sacrificing a few swimming days or a degree or two, you can save significant operating $$$.
The thermal time constant of a pool with proper surface insulation is rather long. You're gonna pay for heat on days/weeks when you won't be using the pool.
Do the math on the thermodynamics and talk to people who have heated pools in your area before you dive in.
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In about 1976 or so, we moved into a house with a pool heater. Gave about 1 degree F per hour of remp rise, hardly worth it.
Sounds like a lot of natural gas, for not much benefit. Solar cover might do more for you.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Anyone have any pool heater info they wanna share with me?
Wifey has been lobbying for a heater and is armed with her mother's chequebook. In the interest of staying married I've caved in and decided that a heater might be a good thing for our kids... I just agreed to this 15 minutes ago, so haven't Googled anything yet.
Pool dimensions are 16 x 32 x 10 feet deep (3 feet at shallow end).
Ontario Canada. Typically our water is heated by the sun to 23 or 24, which I think is 76F. In hot days it can get to 80F. Want a heater that will give us 29 to 30 which I think is 85F but if not, at least to maintain 80F.
Natural gas. Chlorine, Sand filter.
One other question, are these things power vent or pvc exhaust or are they stack exhaust? Want to keep indoors but wonder about air breathing.
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On 8/15/2012 5:17 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Already have a new solar cover.
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On 8/15/2012 5:34 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

Hit send before finishing...
Solar cover is great for keeping heat in but the water heats better when the sun shines on it.
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Roger that!
Solar cover helps retain heat loss. Reduces conduction, convection, evaporation.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Solar cover is great for keeping heat in but the water heats better when the sun shines on it.
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On 8/15/2012 2:39 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

There's an interesting discussion here: http://www.troublefreepool.com/water-absorption-and-heating-from-sunlight-t9604.html
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To answer your questions, all the gas heaters I've seen are simple stack vent type. All the ones I actually have familiarity with are outside, with the stack just ending about 2ft above the unit housing.
The really, really bad news is that these things are MASSIVE. Pool here is 48,000 gallons and has a 400,000 BTU heater. Compare that to the largest residential gas furnace which is probably 120K, maybe 150K, tops. Heating it is just too expensive, so the heater isn't used. You can easily spend thousands of dollars heating a pool. But then here in the nyc area, in summer the pool will be in the low 80s much of the time without heating.
I would look at solar. The ballpark guideline is that you need about as much solar collector area as the pool has surface area. I would think that would be plenty to give you the summer boost that you appear to be looking for. Maybe you can get away with less. If you want it do more, ie extend the season, not have it covered when not in use, etc then you would need more. I've seen calculators online that help in that regard.
The nice thing with solar is that you have to run the pump a good bit of the time for filtering, so the electric to run the pump is paid for, at least for part of the time. They also have multispeed pumps that can cut the cost of running it substantiallly by using low speed . Using that approach, solar is free compared to using a gas heater. And greener too. However, if you don't have the south or west exposure, no roof space or area on the ground, or can't do it because of aesthetics, then that's a factor too.
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On 8/15/2012 2:39 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

Here's another
http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/water_heating/index.cfm/mytopic140
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Put a solar loop on your (south facing) roof, connected into your circulating pump circuit - will keep your pool toasty most of the season (Waterloo Ontario) assuming the roof is not fully shaded by trees.
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On 8/15/2012 7:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I asked about natural gas. Solar on roof is not an option for a few reasons.
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On 8/15/2012 7:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
BTW you offered to help me with a black and decker part a week ago. Thanks for that offer. I found a solution thru ebay but I thot you should be thanked for offering. I'm about 45 minutes away from waterloo area.
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Wouldn't have a pool without it. 85 is a pretty good temp but we extend the season into the 50's and I run that sucker up to 89. It's like a 20K gallon hot tub.
We're on our second Raypak, love it.

You'll Google that, but I don't know why you'd want to keep the heater indoors. -----
- gpsman
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For 15K gallons above ground, I use Hayward's smallest gas heater.
I'm in NJ but only get a few hours of sun on the pool. Somewhere around 86F the pool becomes very comfortable.
Like all things pool related, heaters don't last forever and need occasional repair. I'm on my second one.
I don't find they extend the season at all. Who wants to use a pool when the air temp gets below 75F?
--
Dan Espen

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Dan Espen wrote the following on 8/15/2012 10:43 PM (ET):

The same type of people who clean the snow off the cover of their hot tub on the rear deck in the NE winter so they can get in the warm water. But in the pool, you can do laps. You just don't get out and stand around while wet. :-)
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Some of my best times in an outdoor pool have been when it's below freezing outside. Some of the ski resorts have them and it's really nice. Sipping a beverage of your choice, a cigar perhaps, snow flakes falling, steam rising, sun setting.....
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I'm betting you didn't get out of the pool and put the solar cover back on while dripping wet.
:)
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

These commercial pools don't use covers and they pass on the cost to the customers. It is also deductible on their taxes.
They have heated pools at the country club my wife runs. A small pool will have a 5 ton heat pump that will get them about 20 degrees (F) above ambient air, running all the time. Wind will cut that delta considerably.
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