plumbing code question

Hello group.. I have a question regarding my plumbing..My home has the water heater in a closet inside the laundry room which is ajacent to what used to be the garage (since been converted) The original tank style gas water heater was plumbed with the bypass sticking out the vent grill which used to be a small outdoor alcove..That has been built in to a room now part of the house..This leaves the water heater closet without ANY access to the outside walls. Last year we replaced the water heater with a tankless gas heater and wanted to properly pipe the bypass..The only way we could do it was to run the pipe up into the attic, across and out the eave of the house..I was reading somewhere that the heater is supposed to have it's pop off something like 6" off the ground, I am guessing that would be easy on an outside wall, which we no longer have..The house is on a slab so we don't even have the option to go thru the crawlspace..We are planning on selling the house next year and want to avoid a code violation..But what choice do I have with this? Thanks in advance!!! John
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John wrote:

The relief valve (T&P) has to be plumbed so it discharges to a "safe" location or into a sewer drain. That's because when (if) it blows off, the discharge may be very hot water or even steam. A shower from the eave wouldn't be pleasant under these conditions. <g>
How about running the pipe down the side of the house from the eave to near ground level? The pipe should end less than 6" from ground.
All this assumes that you never have freezing weather where you live.
Will this arrangement pass local inspection? Only your city bldg dep't can tell you.
BTW, if the new heater is in an enclosed closet, there may be issues of clearances and allowance for combustion air (air grill).
Jim
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T and P valve has to be within 6" of the floor. DOES NOT need to be near a drain. Better for you if it was. DOES NOT have to be near an outside wall. I see several w/h's each day and in many configurations but one thing remains constant. the 6" rule.
HTH
rik
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a
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Hi Jim and thanks a lot! I think I am okay on combustion, we had a energy audit/upgrade a few years ago and they blocked off the interior vents and intalled two HUGE flex pipes that go up into the attic and I followed the instructions carefully on all the clearances..Your suggestion about running the drain pipe down the side of the house is a good one...Even tho it's on a non popular side of the house you never know....I will check a local code..Thanks! John
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in a

was
small
house..This
walls.
wanted
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like 6"

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this?
By by-pass, I take it you mean the T/P relief drain line.
I've seen a fair number of water heaters but can't recall any that had the T/P valve tubing going up, let alone to the attic where water in it might freeze. I'm not sure I like the idea when the tubing is to exhaust excessive temp water and pressure. There is going to be a resistance to water flowing up from the valve and that will keep the pressure in the tank as opposed to venting it off quickly. Also, seep leaks could cause the valve to stick closed since the line would always have water in it on top of, or against the seal if the valve does leak. I'd like to know if an inspector would approve the design and I hope that it wouldn't be.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Hello Gary, What choice would I have but go up? There is no exterior wall near the water heater..It would pass thru a doorway no mater which way you ran it..Going down isn't a choice, solid slab foundation..Freezing isn't much of a problem here, this is Austin Texas...I just don't know what else I can do for it...I am hoping I don't have any problem as I really don't have any other choices.... John
wrote

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The contractor working for my neighbor used a door sill over the T/P valve piping going to a drain on the other side of a door. He made a manifold that went from the 3/4 pipe to 4 1/2" copper tubes under the door sill (threshold), then back to 3/4 on the other side. The building inspector here OK'd the design. Walking through the door, you never realize it's not the normal design to have a threshold in that door.
Tom J
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The time to determine how and where is past since it wasn't done prior to building it into its present area but... grooving the floor should work as someone else has said there's was done. I would look into how to correct the potential problems this arrangement can cause.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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