please explain this kitchen wiring...

I am doing the finish electrical work on a new kitchen in my house. I need to get everything working before an inspector reviews my work, and there is one thing in the kitchen that I am having trouble figuring out.
There are two outlet circuits in the kitchen. Call them Appliance #1 and Appliance #2. Appliance #1 begins in a box over the counters and Appliance #2 starts in the next box a few feet away. In both of these boxes "line" is clearly labeled so I know this is where to put a gfi. After the gfi boxes the circuits hit alternating boxes, 3 boxes per circuit. Appliance #1 terminates in a box that has only one wire in. Nothing complicated here. I have attached all the receptacles for Appliance #1 and it works fine.
What is odd is Appliance #2. It does not terminate in a box that has only one wire in it. Furthermore, there is one switch (in a bank of switches the others of which are lights) and this one switch has two blacks. One black is energized when Appliance #2 is energized. So, it is as if Appliance #2 (or some set of boxes on this circuit) is interrupted by a two way switch.
Does this make sense? Is there a code that says that an outlet circuit in a kitchen has to have a switch? And how come Appliance #2 does not terminate in a box that has only one wire in it?
Thanks, mh
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Statement one: hire an electrician
No boxes should have one wire. A recep requires a hot, a neutral, and a ground. Typical - black, white, and green.
It is possible to have a receptacle that is controlled by a switch. There is no requirement to do so, but it is used. Most often it is used to control table lamps. Often it is used by switching only half of a receptacle - bottom plug hot, top plug switched.
I could not follow your description. With the above information, perhaps you can try again. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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The NEC requires two 20 amp (minimum) circuits for kitchen outlets which can also be used to feed dining room outlets, but can not be used for lighting. Assuming when you say "one wire" you mean one cable, is it possible that there should be an outlet in with the switches? There are a number of possible reasons for your dilemma, all of which would best be answered by the person that installed the wiring in the first place

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have you checked for boxes below the counters, say for a garbage disposal under the sink? how about outlets in the cabinets for under cabinet lighting?

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NEC rules doesn't allow under cabinet lighting (except plug in models) or garbage disposals to be on kitchen small appliance outlet circuit. Which doesn't make your suggestion wrong or any less valuable as anything is possible

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