PEX for refrigerant

Hi,
Is there such thing as PEX that you can use instead of copper for HVAC refrigerant?
Thanks!
Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/18/2012 6:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't know personally but googled it up and got hits:
http://www.pexsupply.com/Refrigerant-Line-Sets-Copper-Fittings-For-HVAC-1690000
I would have worried about embrittlement at low temperatures and higher pressures but guess it can be handled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you look at the picture, the pipes may be made by PEX but I can see a copper liner exposed at the ends of the piping.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/18/2012 6:33 PM, Frank wrote:

I think they are just standard pre-made copper line sets (copper tubing, flared ends with flared nuts and overall insulation) that happen to be sold by a company named "pexsupply"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/18/2012 5:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I do a lot of refrigeration and AC work and I've never come across any line sets that were anything but metal. I've had to braze copper to steel fittings and copper can't be used with ammonia refrigerants you must use steel pipe. PEX could used for an evaporator drain line but it depends on the jurisdiction. The last commercial job I was on had the PVC drain lines removed and replaced with copper as per inspector order. O_o
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 18, 8:54pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

Which is why if you were designing a good system, your process liquid would be treated water and the refrigerant charge would only be located in the chilling machine...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/19/2012 1:19 PM, Evan wrote:

Not sure what you're referring to but PVC for condensate drain lines is perfectly acceptable in most jurisdictions but for some reason the inspector wanted the PVC drain lines on that particular job replaced with copper. It was in a clothing store and I think it had something to do with the fact that the drain lines were in what is technically a return air plenum and the plastic was not plenum rated. If I had been involved with the AC system I would have checked on that myself but I was installing the point of sale system, phone system and wiring for the traffic counter. The poor fellows installing the AC units were quite flummoxed by the requirement for copper drains which is why the GC brought in another sub to fix it. All the wiring I installed was plenum rated as per code requirements. Come to think of it, I believe the thermostat wire had to be replaced with plenum rated cable too. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know about PEX, but some plastics will let gas pass through it. The 2 liter and like Coke bottles will let the co2 out. If you look at a bunch of them in a store, some will seem to have more it them than others. The ones that look fuller are the old ones.
Also ,what is the pressuer ratings of PEX ? It may be too low.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 23:51:13 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

That's a joke I hope. Or do you really think water is a compressible liquid....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you really think that the flexible plastic container that soda is typically dispensed in might play a role in such observations when the pressure inside decreases...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 00:53:36 -0700 (PDT), Evan

To the extent that a noticeable change in surface level occurs? No I do not so think. If you think it does do this experiment.... get a new bottle and mark the level .. then open it and see if the level is noticeably higher then the mark. I plan to do this sometime in the next day or so just to see.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No , no joke. I just retired from a company that made the polyester that was shipped to the companies that make the plastic bottles.
No Water will not compress. The plastic streaches. When there is a lot of co2 gas pressure, the sides of the bottle expands outwards, so it is slightly wider. The liquid flows outward so it looks like there is less in the bottles. As the coke looses gas, the sides of the bottle go back in and make the bottle have a slightly less diameter. If you do not believe this, buy a new 2 liter cokes that look the emptiest and one that looks fuller, then let them sit aroud a week or two and compair again. Also compair the taste of two , one being much more fuller looking than the other.
That is why there is no or almost no plastic beer bottles, the beer goes flat too quick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/19/2012 10:27 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

And why there is a special version of PEX tubing for use in heating systems that includes an additional layer which acts as an oxygen barrier.
http://www.uponorpro.com/Extranet/Layouts/ProductAndToolModal.aspx?id =
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd wonder about the fittings leaking.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I don't know about PEX, but some plastics will let gas pass through it. The 2 liter and like Coke bottles will let the co2 out. If you look at a bunch of them in a store, some will seem to have more it them than others. The ones that look fuller are the old ones.
Also ,what is the pressuer ratings of PEX ? It may be too low.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've never heard of anything like that.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Hi,
Is there such thing as PEX that you can use instead of copper for HVAC refrigerant?
Thanks!
Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 5:22:39 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is a new product that was announced at the ASHRAE show. It has the ICC ratings for all refrigerants. It is called Multi-Flex. It is a multi layered pipe that replaces copper in line sets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/2/2015 3:45 PM, Dean wrote:

It is called Multi-Flex. It is a multi layered pipe that replaces copper in line sets.

Hope that cuts down on theft.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes there is a friend of mine used it last week for the first time and said it was awesome and very easy to use! Can't wait to try it....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 3:22:39 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

yes we sell them it is called mutli flex please email me at snipped-for-privacy@reliasales.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maybe they are speaking of Gel Copper linesets. Copper linesets with a polyethylene cover on the insulation.
http://pdmus.com/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.