Painting pine with knots

I must have used a crapped out shellac when I sealed the knots prior to painting pine. Can I get away with painting over it with a stain hider or do I need to sand out the knots and reseal with shellac?
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I dont know how shellac gets "crapped out" to not seal because you use alcohol to thin it, maybe the wood is a bit green and an active knot
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I think it fails to harden properly after a while. Mixed shellac has a shelf life of about 6 months, but he canned stuff is longer.
To answer the OP, I'd wipe the wood down with alcohol first, then apply the sealer, such as Kilz.
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wrote:
: :>I dont know how shellac gets "crapped out" to not seal because you use :> alcohol to thin it, maybe the wood is a bit green and an active knot : :I think it fails to harden properly after a while. Mixed shellac has a :shelf life of about 6 months, but he canned stuff is longer. : :To answer the OP, I'd wipe the wood down with alcohol first, then apply the :sealer, such as Kilz. : You can remove the shellac with alcohol, as recommended. What I did to prevent problems in clear finishing my pine was to follow these instructions:
1. First coat: Very thinned down shellac, a 1/2 lb. cut.
2. Coat with boiled linseed oil and wipe dry with rags after a few minutes (e.g. 15 minutes). Some discarded socks are very good for this.
3. Let dry - depends on weather, anywhere from 4 days to 2 weeks.
4. Two coats of shellac, followed by two applications of furniture wax rubbed in with very fine steel wool.
After almost two years this has been very stable, no bleed through.
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Zinsser's Seal Coat, canned, and spray shellac are dewaxed and other canned shellac is not dewaxed. Seal Coat has an advertised shelf life of three years but it just hit the market. I mix shellac in small quantities and store in the garage fridge and expect to use it in six months. When it gets old it doesn't dry and harden. Test a drop on glass and if it isn't dry and hard to thumbnail test in a half hour it's not usable. Some use that to make a tack rag.
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