Paint removal from flooring

When I painted, I got some mist from a sprayer on some sheet flooring. What is the EASIEST way to get it off? It is slight over a large area. Is there a cleaner that will dissolve it? Do I rent a buffing machine with a scrubber pad? The paint is interior latex.
Steve
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denatured alcohol is a latex solvent , wet a towel, leave on area till soft, and clean with clean alcohol wetted towel.
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Boy I tell you what, you have just saved me a lot of trouble.
I'm just about to begin tiling my floors (never having tried this before) so I decided to start in a small closet. When I ripped up the carpet, I found that the floor had almost as much paint on it as the walls. Most of my day has been spent with a small scraper, trying to remove this stuff but after seeing your tip about the denatured alcohol, I went in there and cleaned about a 4" square in less than 5 seconds.
Many thanks.
Lewis.
http://tinyurl.com/r3r6 .........................
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Goof off or the equiv. works well for latex removal...should be available in most paint/ hardware stores....If it is a large area a buffer would be useful otherwise simply wet with goof-off, soak a bit, scrub and rinse well.......the smell isn't particularly strong but ventilation is recomended.....Soggy

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You dont use buffers on sheet vinyl or you ruin the factory finish.
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Not true at all for a normal speed scrubbing/polishing buffer......however what pad or brush used depends on the surface...obviously a wire brush, a polygrit brush or certain aggressive pads including screening disks are not suitable for all surfaces or purposes. Soggy
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Actualy , with interior latex on a floor all he has to do is dampen a dropcloth with soapy water for apx 4 hrs or so. And wash off. Goof off is 5 times the price of denatured alcohol, has some volitile chemicals in it . And as far as running any kind of buffer on sheet goods, I would not waiste the money or risk ruining the finish, If he does it wrong , he is screwed. Keep it simple.
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Ease of removal depends on how "old" the paint is ...new paint obviously being much easier..fresh enough and a wet rag will suffice, next step being a scotchbrite pad and a lot of water......older still a chemical assist does wonders...... Can't say I ever tried using denatured alcohol on latex but when I've done shellacked wood floors with alcohol drying time was pretty quick or problematic.....Goof off on tile floors wasn't nearly so volatile...much easier to soak, scrub and rinse before drying (price wise last time I bought a gallon it was 2-3 times the cost of alcohol). Incidentally if the sheet floor isn't smooth(pretty common with sheet floors) a buffer with a brush would indeed do a better job...with a novice the walls are at considerably more at risk than the floor<G>. If one chose to skip the buffer a hand brush and a scotchbrite pad would be useful....The floor may be too soft for a razor blade but a good putty knife would be helpful as well.....Soggy
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Scotch brite pad ! Putty Knife ! you Will scratch the finish. I also said to let the tarp sit for at least 4 hrs , wet , with soapy water, Beleive me . It will work . Strong TSP and water will remove old lead based oil paint. Just soak something in it you will see.
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