Paint, Is there a big difference?

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Sorry, you'll have to do your own research to answer that one :) Both their websites are easy to find, and I recall getting a prompt email response from Zinsser a few years ago.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

I've already checked the websites and the store shelves. I've yet to find a water-base primer from any company that's explicitly rated for horizontal wood surfaces exposed to weather and foot traffic. You seemed knowledgeable; thought maybe there was some street wisdom that one of their products could be successfully used in that type of application, even though the labelling didn't explicitly indicate such.
Zinsser owns Wolman. Wolman makes a product called "Woodlife Classic". Ever heard of it?
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<...snipped...>

I've heard of Wolman but am not familiar with any specific products. I gether that you are intent on using a latex product for your application. If you would consider another type, I would recommend a good quality, exterior rated oil-based poly floor paint. Over bare wood many of these products recommend priming by simply using a slightly thinned coat of the same porduct. I have had good results and long wear from these on outdoor porches over the years.
Although, I recently heard that many such items are being taken off the market in my area for environmental reasons. Does that have anything to do with your need to use a latex floor paint?
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

No. The reason for preferring latex has to do with the particular application requirements. In my experience, oil-base products are VERY sensitive to moisture in the wood. With the exception of July and maybe August, it's difficult to find enough warm dry days in a row to make sure the wood is absolutely bone dry. Latex is far more forgiving with regard to slight moisture in the wood.
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On 19 Sep 2006 07:31:54 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com quickly quoth:

OK, now I believe you. <g>
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The problem with Consumer Reports is they didn't test all the best paints.
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Scott Townsend wrote:

As long as you are buying top shelf paint, I think they are pretty close. Don't buy the apartment or contractor grade sub $15/gal junk.
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with paint you get what you pay for go for the best you don't save money by buying cheap paint

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roemax wrote:

You can pay $30/gal for worthless paint too. So just because you pay a lot doesn't mean you're getting good quality.
And, there are some excellent quality paints available for a lot less than the name brands that have high mark-ups and profit margins.
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I've use Lowes Valspar Severe Weather paint on a couple of places with irregulsr t111 siding. One was a vary dark color going over. Excellent one coaat coverage and bonding. I wouldn't use "better" paint if it were on sale for less for that application. It ain't broke so I an't fixin' it.
$75 for 5 gal. You can get good paint at a low price if you hit one right. But $15 Walmart paint is $15 Walmart paint.
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Al Bundy wrote:

Why, just because?
With their massive purchasing power WalMart has huge clout. No other company is in a better position to sell quality paint inexpensively.
That doesn't mean everything at WalMart is a quality product - far from it. But conversely, just because something is sold at WalMart doesn't mean it is an inferior product.
Check out the July 06 issue of Consumer Reports. McCloskey Multi-Use is highly rated. McCloskey's "Multi-Use" line is (or was) marketed exclusively by WalMart. It sells for about $13/gal.
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I tried some of the Color Place exterior white slightly tinted on not too picky trim. The trim was white to start with. It took two coats to get a decent cover. It was just try it, what the hell. I knew better.
So, "$15 Walmart paint", Color Place line.
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Al Bundy wrote:

As I said, "That doesn't mean everything at WalMart is a quality product - far from it"
I bought 2 gallons of ColorPlace exterior satin off-white latex 4 years ago at WalMart and did my wrap-around porch railings and posts. One coat did the job; still looks great. I understand that recently the manufacturer of the ColorPlace line was changed. So, if your experience is typical, the paint is no longer very good quality.
So, you've got to shop around and get up-to-date infomation from people who know the score. Paying $30 for a gallon of paint doesn't guarantee you're getting good paint; paying $15 for a gallon doesn't guarantee you're getting junk paint.
The old addage "you get what you pay for" is true more often than not, but not always.
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Fully agree with all that!
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Well, because it's $15, yes. It doesn't matter that Walmart might or might not have a reputation for cheapness. And it doesn't matter that they have buying power. Maybe it's $18 paint, but that is still pretty cheap paint. At least once you're used to using top-grade paint of around $25 or more. Once you've painted with one-coat low-splatter paint, you will never want to go back. You can buy 2 gallons of $15 paint and then paint your bedroom twice. I will buy 1 gallon of $28 paint and paint my bedroom once, thank you very much.
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jeffc wrote:

Paying $28 for a gallon of paint doesn't guarantee that you're getting good paint.
Paying $15 for a gallon of paint doesn't guarantee that you're getting junk paint.
You have know what you're buying.
How much do you think it costs the manufacturer to make a gallon of good quality latex paint? What percentage of the price you pay do you think is the actual cost of making the paint?
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Assuming it's the right paint for the job, it pretty much does.

"Junk" paint, no, not necessarily. But just because a store has "buying power" does not turn $15 paint into $30 paint. It's just not possible to use the same ingredients for that price.

Obviously it's partly the research that went into developing the paint. It's also the superior and higher concentration of materils, such as 100% acrylic, etc.
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jeffc wrote:

How do you know this? Do you have data on the manufacturer's cost for binder, pigments, and fillers? Where did you get the data?

You can walk into the big-box stores and buy 100% acrylic (with the exact same CAS number as the $30 paint) for under $15. It's too bad they're not required by law to list percentages in addition to CAS numbers. It would make comparison shopping a whole lot less mysterious and anecdotal.
I must have two dozen different paints and primers in my basement. Some of the very inexpensive ones are quite good.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

How much do you think it actually costs to manufacture a gallon of paint?
Not all sub-$15 is junk. WalMart carries (or used to) McCloskey Multi-Use for less than $15/gal which was highly rated in the July 06 Consumer Reports. I used it four years ago to paint a horizontal surface exposed to sun, rain, ice, and snow. It's holding up well.
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Lowes has a new premium exterior paint and they often have a $5 rebate per gallon to bring it down to $25. I don't know how long it will last because it is new. I have not had good experience with Behr interior paint. It was OK but nothing great and drippy. That was to years ago so maybe they have changed it. I tried Lowes American Traditions interior paint and thought it was excellent in comparison. I have heard a lot of good things about Sherwin Williams premium exterior paint. IMHO exterior paint is the last place to skimp unless you are flipping a house and could care less how long it looks good. I shiver when I see those house flipping shows at what the new owner is going to experience a few years down the line.
Steve

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