Paint, Is there a big difference?

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Kelly Moore, Benjamin Moore, Sherman William, Glidden, Berr, Etc...
In Painting the Exterior of a house, is there really that big of a Difference in the Paint itself, or are we just talking colors or?
I was recommended some Benjamin Moore paint and for this project I need to cut some costs. Will Glidden or Home Depot Paint work just as well?
Thanks, Scott<-
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Scott Townsend wrote:

Try Consumer Reports. They do actual testing and have data available, which I'd rely on more than random opinion.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

And according to Consumer Reports, Behr paint (Home Depot) is rated the best.
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snipped-for-privacy@bluebottle.com wrote:

??? According to Consumer Reports the very best exterior paint is California (flat, 90%), followed by Glidden (semi-gloss, 87%). Behr (Premium Plus, 59%) was number 13. When I used the "best" Behr exterior, which had a "lifetime guarantee", it was peeling in less than 2 years, and it was over a properly prepped and primed shed with brand new siding. Thank goodness the shed was small! In my opinion Behr is the worst paint ever, but of course, YMMV.
Hilary
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

Okay, "California" paint is not sold in my state (Texas). If I bought some of their flagship 2010 Residential Paint base, could one of their competitors (HD, Sherwin-Williams, etc.), do the color match?
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wrote:

I've used California paint. My secondary supplier carries it. It's good paint but no better than first line Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams. Save yourself some trouble.
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

I'll bet there was moisture coming through the painted shed. Was it new, green wood, maybe?
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote in wrote:

Hope it was allowed to dry if it was the type that needed it.
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Al Bundy wrote:

Well...according to the supplier it was "ready to paint", but we put it up, caulked, waited three weeks, then lightly sanded and powerwashed it. Then we used Bin (or Kilz, or whatever Behr recommended) on the knots, Behr latex exterior primer, and 2 coats of Behr exterior "Premium Plus". We also had one wall of a carport painted at the same time as the shed (right next to each other), and it already had a perfectly serviceable coat of paint. Since the shed was to be a different color, we powerwashed the carport wall as well, and painted it. It had EXACTLY the same amount of peeling as the new siding in the same amount of time.
Hilary
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

How many days did you wait for the wood to dry after power-washing before you primed and painted?
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On 18 Sep 2006 21:20:03 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com quickly quoth:

Don't you see the key? You powerwashed then painted. Paint doesn't like moisture. You mentioned waiting 3 weeks the first time but didn't mention any wait prior to painting after powerwashing.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

No, that's NOT the key. I didn't mention waiting 4 (sunny) days between powerwashing and beginning to paint because, well, only a complete IDIOT would start the prep with the wood still wet. Same reason I originally failed to mention leaving the raw wood for several weeks, only an IDIOT paints green wood. We waited 4 days, applied the Bin, waited 2 more days, applied the primer. Waited 2 more days, applied coat one. After 2 more days, coat two. Sheesh. It wasn't bad prep or moisture, it was lousy paint. Hilary
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It doesn't have to be "wet" to be wet.
There are quite a number of articles in Fine Homebuilding magazine about paint versus pressure washing. Many painters simply will NOT pressure wash wood siding at all, and others will wait weeks before painting.
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

Your anger is misplaced Hilary.
I assume you used oil-based primer on the knots. 4 days is not long enough after power washing to be using oil-based primer.
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Ether Jones wrote:

Anger??? What anger? Whatever. No, I did NOT use the oil-based knot sealer, I used the latex Bin stuff recommended by the Behr paint can. It said it drys in 2 hours and the primer can be applied in 24 hours. I waited 48. Also, since I only treated the knots with the Bin, why would the whole structure peel uniformly? Must be the paint. the wood was NOT wet.
I've used the EXACT same process I used on the shed on other exterior structures over the years, and have had many years of success with exterior paint, as long as it wasn't Behr's "best" latex.
I'm in the process of doing exactly the same procedure on the house, with both new and old siding. This time, however, I'm using the top rated (Consumer Reports) California paint, which is rated to be 10 years. I've got to say that it's the best paint I've ever used - goes on smooth, one coat coverage (over their oil primer for the new stuff), no drips, no splatters. The consistency compared to any Behr product I've ever used is exponentially better. I'll let you know how it lasts :) H
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

The "IDIOT" anger. The "Sheesh" anger.

In your post to which I was responding, you said:
"Then we used Bin (or Kilz, or whatever Behr recommended) on the knots, Behr latex exterior primer"
This sounds like you used BIN or Kilz on the knots, and Behr latex primer on the rest of the wood. Two different primers. The usual reason for using spot primer on the knots is because oil primer works better than latex primer on knots. That's why most knot primer is oil-based. That's why I assumed that the spot primer you used on the knots was oil-based.
Are you sure the knot-primer you used was water-based? The way you stated it ("or whatever Behr recommended") sure makes it sound like you didn't recall clearly what product you used. If it was indeed an oil primer, that might help explain the problem you experienced.
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Ether Jones wrote:

Yes...I'm sure. I know because I can read a can of paint. I know what it is because it's the same stuff I'm using now - Bin latex. I still had an old can of it in the garage, and it's the same as what was recommended by the California paint people (my local paint guy called them to ask). Yes, we are using it just on the knots, and we prime over both the wood and the Bin. I know it's water based because it cleans up with just water and a little ammonia. Stinky, but cleans up fast. The boards are dry to the touch in an hour and can supposedly be primed the next day, although I wait at least 48 hours. For this current paint job I KNOW the wood is dry (not green, etc.) because the clapboards sat in my garage for 6 months before we were ready to put up the siding. Again, I've been painting exterior structures for more than 40 years, and the only paint I've EVER had start peeling in such a short time was Behr. I had a contractor paint my house years ago with some big box brand (he supplied the paint - I was SO stupid!) and it lasted less than 2 years. I found an old paint can in the garage recently that was the same color as that job, and lo and behold, that was Behr paint, too! It wasn't even the "Premium" stuff, so yeah, I really think that there's a huge difference in quality and results when it comes to paint. H
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snipped-for-privacy@fashionsintime.com wrote:

Back to the shed: what exactly is peeling? Is the paint peeling from the primer (and the primer is still adhering to the wood), or is the primer peeling from the wood (and the paint is still adhering to the primer)? The difference is important.
I'm assuming the primer and the topcoat paint are different colors so you can see the difference.
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Just for clarification, BIN is a product of the Zinsser company. It is neither an oil-based primer nor a latex primer, but a pigmented shellac and normally recommended for interior use. Zinsser makes several other primers including "123", a latex interior/exterior primer, and "Coverstain", an oil-based int/ext primer.
Kilz is a brand name of MasterChem Industries. They make several oil based and latex based products that use 'Kilz' in the name.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

Does either Zinsser or MasterChem make a water-base primer rated for horizontal wood surfaces exposed to weather and heavy foot traffic?
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