paint for concrete/cinder block outdoor steps

I have steps leading up to the house that have some peeling paint and I want to repaint them. Looks like cinder block with some concrete sides where the railings mount.
1. Other than scrub cleaning with a detergent, do I need to wash with something like muriatic acid? I think I will use Behr "porch and floor" paint (latex) which says to use their brand of concrete degreaser and let "cure" for 30 days before painting. Should that do it?
2. Obviously some paint will be left. Do I need to *completely* get rid of the old paint? Goal is to do this right within reason. It would be great if it lasts for years to come, but doesn't need to last a lifetime.
3. Are there any other steps I am missing here besides cleaning, priming and painting? Just planning on using the products that Behr recommends all the way down the line.
Suggestions?
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getting advise from home depot? Go to a paint store. There are excellent non skid product available for stairs.You've left out too many details to ascertain what method to fix it ,As far as waiting 30 days forget it ,Don't use that product,Send me a pic if you can with some details on whats presently on it Peter I.U.P.A.T District council 46

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wrote:

My suggestion would be to rent a pressure washer and blow all the old paint off the steps and then DON'T repaint them.
ANY paint you put on steps will have to be repainted soon. Even if you use that epoxy paint made for finishing garage floors. It will wear off and be slippery when wet.
Unless the cement under the paint is very ugly I would just leave em unpainted.
HM
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Make sure you don't use Behr for anything. I've had Behr products fail on me four different times (I didn't buy the paint). Go to Sherwin-Williams, or any local *paint* store for that matter, and they will be able to help you. Acrylic latex primer and paint will work fine, though there are oil-base floor products out there that will work too. Some products aren't spec'd for foot traffic, so you'll need to ask about that at the paint store. Chances are, they'll have something on hand that's called something like "Floor Paint," "Concrete Stain," etc.

You'll want to *lightly* powerwash first to remove the loose/flaking paint. Make sure you don't blast the joints or corners. Don't try to take it all off with the powerwasher. Scrape any loose paint the powerwasher doesn't remove. You do not need to remove all of the old paint, only the loose paint.

If there is a white powdery looking substance (efflorescence), you'll need to wire brush it off as much as possible. Don't worry about degreasing the concrete unless there is a need. In other words, clean any chemicals off first. If you see water being repelled by the surface of the concrete, you'll want to clean it first. Most likely, the water will just sink right in.
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An alternative to Epoxy or Acrylic is Moisture-Cure (MC) Urethane. The one-pack product is generally more forgiving of ambient and surface conditions and easily out performs any latex. Be sure not to apply overly thick though. I've had MC urethane (Wasser MC Luster) on my garage/shop floor for over ten years now. Lots of solvent spills and dragging equipment over the surface with NO failure.
HJW, NACE1195
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