Outlet position according to code.

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If you're a follower and never question authority, i guess it's a good rule.
s

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There are times to vehemently question authority, there are times to do what you are told.
Works both way. I often take the suggestions from subordinates but I sometimes just say "that is the way I want it". I don't have to give a reason, other than I'm the boss.
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Company rule, not "law". And he was out of line. Also, why would the cover plate screws work loose? I've never seen one work loose in my life.
s

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On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 14:47:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Either way is acceptable. Install all the outlets in the same orientation.
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Code does not care. Seems to be getting more and more the accepted practice to have them ground up, especially in offices where a paper clip could fall onto the prongs. I don't know if there are any documented cases of a paper clip falling onto prongs though.
In my case, two room air conditioners would have the cord hand better if the pin was up. I recently bought a power strip and the cord can be rotated on the plug to easily accommodate either.
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wrote:

Too bad they dont make outlets where the ground pin can be rotated to the preferred side. <LOL>.
I never realized how confusing and complicated this could all get. The point about the neon tester is a good one, since they are intended for the ground down. As far as paperclips landing on outlets in an office, that should be grounds for dismissal. Throwing paperclips is dangerous and should not be tolerated. Heaven forbid if the ground prong was UP, and the paperclip got hung on it, and touched the hot prong as it spun around the ground prong.
I sure am glad the code dont specify the correct way, the whole world would be in chaos......
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 07:44:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

Such a tester should work just as well with either orientation. I don't have any ground-up wall receptacles to try this with, but they work fine in extension cords turned any way.

Rules don't prevent accidents (or 2 year olds).

That would be difficult to arrange. You could fit a paper clip around the ground prong and then plug it in.

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Like this:
http://www.360electrical.com/index-3.html
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I'll bet you could, on purpose, dump a whole box of paperclips right down the wall, and none would land on the prongs. And if the cord was plugged in properly, the prongs won't be exposed anyway.
s

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Isn't that why God created circuit breakers?

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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 10:02:12 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

There's still a spark, and sometimes a receptacle will be close to a leaking gas heater.

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I think you have to many "what if's" to make it practical

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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 13:16:42 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

That could be true if installing a receptacle ground-up was any harder than installing it ground-down. Since there isn't any difference there, even a very small difference in risk makes it worthwhile.

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wrote:

That is why you put up the asbestos barrier.
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Don't get him started with asbestos!!!
wrote:

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wrote:

And hope you don't have one of those non-trip breakers people have been talking about.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 08:27:53 -0500, "Steve Barker LT"

However, the probability of this causing a short is still greater than with the ground up.

These things (plugs) do get knocked loose. If the prongs still make contact, the user is unlikely to notice.

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