outdoor grease lubricant

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Doug wrote:

Three questions: 1. Why did you have to lubricate the latch in the first place, 2. Why do you think the latch needs ongoing lubrication, and 3. Why do you believe an ordinary latch, with 1/4" or more of tolerances, will be affected by dirt?
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wrote:

I could upload a picture but regardless, I just thought a little lubricant was good because it's a slight rub metal on metal. I don't know how familiar people here are with wood gates in Texas, but they are notorious for settling where the hinges are and the posts move a bit as they age so the latches no matter how perfect at one time will likely not be perfect a year later even with minimum useage. I know it's not really rocket science and I did make adjustments yesterday to make it work better. I was just hoping to make it still better with some lubricant. I may be just too picky trying to perfect something that's not going to be that way a year later no matter what I do now so perhaps I did good enough <g>. I wanted to make it effortless to open but it takes a little effort to open but I think a 60 yr old woman could do it if she knows how to work the latch. Now that makes me think how many 60 yr old women does it take to open the latch. Probably 5 or 6... one to try to open it and the rest to haggle over it.
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You say that as if posts don't settle, warp or move anywhere else but Texas.
I don't know how familiar you are with the rest of the world, but wood basically reacts to its local environment in pretty much the same manner everywhere.

Use one of these:
http://www.hooverfence.com/woodfence/rrlooplatch.htm
Pretty much effortless and not very hard to figure out.
P.S. You may have insulted a few 60 yr old woman by implying that they can't open something that requires more than a "little effort".

The more important question is this:
How many 60 yr old woman will be opening the latch in question? There's no real point in making it easy to use for a population that will never use it.
Disclaimer: I speak in generalities just to make a point. I mean no disrespect to any 60 yr old woman in regards to their gate opening capabilities.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

You evidently have never heard of the recent regulation requiring every public-access swimming pool in the country (think Howard Johnson or Holiday Inn) to have lift access for the disabled or the regulations that went into effect March15th. These latest regs include: * Businesses must allow miniature horses as guide animals * Slope limits on miniature golf courses * Ample "turning space" at a shooting range
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On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 22:58:07 -0500, Doug wrote:

What you need are hinge umbrellas, designed to keep them shaded and the rain off.
;)
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2012 14:01:44 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

LOL! What he needs are stainless hinges.
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2012 10:48:32 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Better yet, take the gate off and fence it in. Then no one can get in or out unless thru the house and I won't have to worry about no stinkin' latches <grin> !!
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I've found that silicon lubricant (the cheap aftermarket auto parts store brand works as well as the name brand for 99.9% of the applications I run into.
BTW I live in Texas and have property in both N Texas and along the coast (the stuff works well with plastic,aluminum and other metals). Best is that the residue does not 'get on good clothes' - (my wife, daughters, DILs and granddaughters are pleased)
Yes you have to renew the application but that's no hill for a stepper. Gates at the beach house gets a shot at the beginning of the season and one at the end. (ditto the door hinges and lock as do the slides on the windows) Occasionally we need to give them a shot around New Years but not often.
At one time we had problems with ice in car door locks following rain and a quick freeze. Don't know if there was any correlation but have not had a frozen lock in years.
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On Wednesday, June 27, 2012 10:40:20 AM UTC-6, NotMe wrote:

Silicon spray lube will work fine but not great if you want to paint any wood that it gets on. Personally, I wouldn't bother lubing gate latches...they don't get used that much and they usually have enough clearance to not seize up.
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When you say "they don't get used that much", I assume that you are speaking for your own gate latches, not gate latches in general.
I alone have two gate latches that get used multiple times a day.
Maybe about once a year the latches get a little stiff. A quick blast of WD-40 loosens them right up.
Personally, I don't care about the science beyond WD-40 and whether it is, by definition, a lubricant or not.
Here's what I do care about:
Maybe about once a year the latches get a little stiff. A quick blast of WD-40 loosens them right up.
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2012 13:17:16 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'm guessing you manipulate them as - or right after - you spray them with WD-40. I don't have gate latches, but am a bit interested in science. So I'm thinking plain water would do the same thing - wash out the grunge. What I use to lube just about anything metal is clean engine oil. Got one pump can and one dimple-bottom can. Wipe away excess with a rag. It's pretty long lasting. But whatever works for the individual is what I say.
--
Vic


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The lithium might work. LPS 3 might work, it dries to a wax.
Greg
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On 6/26/2012 10:58 PM, Doug wrote:

I've been using industrial chain lube to lubricate anything exposed to the weather. I get it at auto parts stores. ^_^
http://store.veeindustries.com/liquid-wrench-industrial-chain-lubricant.aspx
http://goo.gl/6kP4Z
TDD
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2012 16:29:32 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Sounds a bit like overkill but it also sounds like it will do the job nicely. I just have to be careful to not overspray but that's easy enough with a rag afterwards. Thanks.
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Consider masking off the area around the latch so that the overspray never makes contact with the wood.
Once the overspray gets on the wood, some of it will soak in and a rag won't get it all off. This might impact the future use of a finish that might not take because of the grease. This might not be a big deal in this case, but I just thought I'd bring up masking as a "best practice" to avoid the consequences of overspray.
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On Thu, 28 Jun 2012 07:28:55 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Good point and thank you. This is on a rental home so likely I won't stain the wooden fence but I'll try to be careful nonetheless. I like your point regardless and will note it !!!
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On 6/28/2012 10:12 AM, Doug wrote:

The can comes with the little plastic tube that slips into the nozzle and I usually just apply a small amount using a quick blip of the valve. You can also spray it on a brush like a flux brush to apply the lube to flat surfaces of a mechanism. ^_^
TDD
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Now, we need a flame war if the LRT improves WD, or detracts from it? I think the LRT improves, and anyone who says other wise is a potty head.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

The can comes with the little plastic tube that slips into the nozzle and I usually just apply a small amount using a quick blip of the valve. You can also spray it on a brush like a flux brush to apply the lube to flat surfaces of a mechanism. ^_^
TDD
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On 6/28/2012 8:16 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'd use WD-40 SPECIALIST PROTECTIVE WHITE LITHIUM GREASE
http://www.wd40specialist.com/products/lithium-grease /
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About three or four days ago, I did suggest white lithium spray. Aparently, this thread refuses to die?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'd use WD-40 SPECIALIST PROTECTIVE WHITE LITHIUM GREASE
http://www.wd40specialist.com/products/lithium-grease /
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