OT Tire slow leak

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I have a slow leak in one of my tires. Takes a week or two to lose 10 - 15 PSI and set off the car's low tire warning. Annoying.
I'm sure a tire shop won't find a leak that slow. I guess I'll just have to remember to top off the tire every week or so. With my memory?
Anything else I can try - besides buying a new tire?
TIA
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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On Tuesday, March 11, 2014 1:00:28 PM UTC-4, KenK wrote:

I suggest you try. Take it off and use some soapy water. Often it's a nail that is still in the tire. When you pull it out the leak won't be slow any more. Better to find it now than to have it turn into a fast leak while you are on the road somewhere.
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check the valve. if you aren't sure how, bring it into a shop... they will usually have to take the tire off, so it might cost a bit more than you would like.
visually inspect it though... does it look good to you?
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On 03/11/2014 12:19 PM, Adam Kubias wrote:

Yep, it very often is a valve when there is a very slow leak. At any rate a tire shop should be able to find the problem as long as you explain it's a very small leak.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 10:03:47 -0700 (PDT), jamesgang

a valve core. VERY occaisionally you will find air coming out through a sidewall (tire body defect or curb damage)
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On 3/11/2014 12:00 PM, KenK wrote:

Of course they will...and so can you if you try. They'll put in in a dunk tank and find it. That slow, it's a good chance it's the valve stem...try the spit test on it.
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Aluminum wheels by any chance?
My daughter bought a used car with aluminum wheels. Within the first month we had it in the shop twice for slow leaks in the front tires. After they both turned out to require nothing more than the cleaning and sealing of the rims to get a better seal, I brought it back and had them do the other 2 wheels as a preventative measure. Things have been fine since then.
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I had a car that leaked like that, one day my wife drove on the flat, it w as a emergency. The only fast replacement wheel was a steel one, in the nex t year the only one that didnt go flat. the tire shop shwed me the problem, I bought 4 replacment steel wheels and never had a flat again.
alunimum wheel rust with a white poweder that causes rim leaks.
steel can too but it takes many many years.......
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What was the weight difference between the steel wheel and the aluminum ones?
I'm not sure that driving for a year with one different wheel is a good idea, but I could be wrong.
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i really dont know, at the time my mom had just died, in a 2 year period 7 close friends and family died. I was barely functional, and actually forgot about the wheel trouble, till I realized the ONLY tire that didnt go flat was the steel one
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wrote:

steel rims, I'll still take aluminum rims over steel - particularly for my summer tires - but I run alloys on my winter tires too - and i'm in the salt belt. Sure, they start to leak at about 5 years - but by then the rubber is hard enough I throw the tires away anyways - and clean the rims. I do have one slow leaker on the Taurus right now - on a wheel that I paid a tire shop to install the new tires. I'll likely end up breaking the bead and cleaning it up when the weather gets warm.
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Two vehicles with aluminum rims. Problem all the time. Sometimes it seals, especially with stop leak. If it seals, another one may start to leak. They all leak over time. I don't remember having problems with my old Dakota aluminum rims, nor with another set I had for 30 years, but that didn't see weather conditions and salt.
Greg
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wrote:

Looks like aluminum - doesn't have shine of chrome.

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"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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On 3/11/2014 1:00 PM, KenK wrote:

Don't be so sure they won't find it. I had a tire like that and the tire shop pulled a 3" nail out of it. That small leak may become a big leak on a cold dark night. Get it checked.
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Many years ago my brother heard a clack-clack-clack as he was driving. He stopped and saw the hex head of a bolt in his tire. He brought the tire to a shop to have the bolt removed and the tire plugged.
He watched as the mechanic pulled and pulled and pulled on the bolt. Turned out to be a six inch long 3/8” bolt. He must have hit it just right to drive it all the way into the tire and have it seal itself tight.
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On Wed, 12 Mar 2014 00:41:22 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

plug, as well as numerous miscalaneous pieces of hardware.
Then there was the brand new car with a WAY offbalance tire - with a full bottle of "Black Label" in it. Somebody was drinking on the job and didn't want to get caught, I guess.
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I agree, a competent shop should dunk it, rotate it, and find the leak.
What I do in case my tire goes flat when a shop is not convenientis carry a can of stop-leak. It has enough compressed air to inflate the tire pretty much, and some sticky stuff to seep out of the leak and seal it. If one only has one can and he uses it, he has no can and has to buy a can immediately or he'll have no can. So for a while I carried two cans. But if then I use one can, I'll only have one can, and that's not enough, so I carried three cans. Nothing made the numbers go up higher after that. Now that I get so few flats, I'm down to one can.
I also carry strings, a little glue, and two tire repair tools. I've patched a lot of my own leaks, made by nails, etc. I also carry a 12v tire inflator. It puts out enough air to find a leak if you look closely, unless you've separated the bead from the rim, but if you have, by the weight of the car perhaps, you can usually squeeze the tire or stand on it enough to get that part back the way it was. Just follow the directions to use the strings. You need a tool, like a needle with an eye, to push it in, twist it, and pull it out. Had a cheap thin one that I used several tiems but eventually it broke and I bought a bigger better one. There is a also a rasp-like tool which I didn't have most years and did fine without it, but I finally got one. Haven't had a flat since. It helps to have a razor or razor tool, to cut off the string where it comes out of the tire, but I think I just let it wear off.
Strings are better than plugs, and maybe easier too.
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On 3/11/2014 2:12 PM, micky wrote:

The more expensive stuff with the push button and hose, worth the money. The one with the one nipple on top, not as effective.
I'd take the tire in to a shop, and have it checked.
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Christopher A. Young
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What I want is to stop leaks in my tires when they occur.

It's easy to take a bicycle tire off the rim, but not a car tire. You need a machine that I don't have space for, and the shops don't even use the hand machine, because it's too much work. They use a pneumatic machine that's much bigger yet.
And it's certainly not something I'd want to do on the road, but I have patched tires with strings on the road.

Government schools should teach auto maintenance?
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On 3/12/2014 2:58 AM, micky wrote:

Sm: Years ago, an old guy showed me how to change tires with a bumper jack, vehicle, and a couple of pry bars. It's a heck of a lot of work, but I've done it.

Sm: Yes, those plug kits with the goopy strings, do work.

but I've never needed to know the names of the countries in Europe, or the cause of death of Louis VII. I've also never had a moment to find the derivative of 4x^3-3x^2-x-dx.
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