OT: police refuse to do their job

Page 7 of 8  


What do you plan to do with these cheap handguns??? Are they an extra gift for the thieves? Do you WANT to leave firearms where they can easily be stolen???
How would these guns sitting in easily burgled autos or vacant homes going to protect your property,unless YOU are there to USE them? (and I suspect you wouldn't -use- them,nor would it be legal.)
Are you deranged? (I believe you certainly are not rational.)
Why aren't you buying auto alarms?
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
this interesting note:

(Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A cheap,"non-functional" handgun can STILL be used to commit crimes;how will you know if the gun a crook is pointing at you is functional,or even loaded;it doesn't matter,you HAVE to treat it as a real,working gun.
Point an unloaded or fake gun at a police officer,and they will shoot you if you refuse to comply with their instructions.Shoot a crook threatening you with an unloaded or non-functional gun,and it gets logged as a legit self-defense and you do not get prosecuted.
And such guns -could- be repaired to make them functional enough for their crimes.
This idiot thinks it's better to increase the severity of a theft(by leaving firearms with his other goods) rather than make any effort to protect his property *before* it gets stolen.
"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."
A Thousand Bucks would buy a really decent alarm(several),with a pager so he could go out there and detain or even shoot the crooks,doing a real public service,rather than arming criminals and hoping it makes the police "look harder" after it'a all stolen.
I bet he also was too LAZY to write his local paper about how law enforcement ignored his theft,to make a big,public stink about it.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Interesting idea. I'd make sure they were no-ops first, and non-repairable (not too hard to do if you have a decent set of basic tools).
Another intereseting option would be to use replicas instead of real no-op weapons. they're not htat expensive, and a decent one would fool someone that doesn't know guns.
One of my personal favorites (and how I store my weapons) is to custom load a round with the largest powder charge it will take, and make the slug ovesized enough that it won't fit down the barrel. Each of my stored weapons has a round like that in the chamber. If someone ever steals one, it looks properly loaded. If they ever try to use it, they're going to loose a big chunk of flesh...... Liability? maybe, but I'm just a hobbyist homeloader, and I guess I must have made a mistake with that round......
What really sucks is that this is the type of thing that has to be done to get the local cops to actually do *anything*. that and the fact that we pay taxes to pay them to sit in the donut shop, while we're left to our own devices to protect ourselves and our property.....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jd wrote:

When they rack the slide to see if it's loaded, it will eject your booby-trap.
"make the slug ovesized enough that it won't fit down the barrel"? You cast your own bullets and have a special oversized mold set up for each caliber? What a load of BS.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many years back I had my house broken into. I happened to be over at my neighbor's house having a few beers & was having a leak when I looked out the window and saw a guy coming out of my back door carrying a couple of my old leather travel bags. I called the cops and they caught the loser about 5 minutes later standing at a bus stop a block away. They came & took prints, etc to build up a case. Very helpful & professional. The guy they caught had actually been at my neighbor's a little earlier soliciting business for his father's landscaping business. Guess he was moonlighting.
Then you get the regular flatfoots that have nothing better to do than harass people for minor crap whilst more serious crimes are occuring. I often laugh when I see interceptors speeding by with the lights flashing thinking that they just got a call that fresh donuts were just put out at Tim Horton's.
R

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<story snipped>
Many years ago, we left our house and came back a few hours later. On the door was a business card to call Officer Smith at the local police department.
My neighbor came over and told me this story:
Some burglars came to my house. My neighbor saw them. He got his shotgun, his wife called 911. He came over with pump shotgun and made the burglars lay on the floor. Cops came. Caught the burglars. Had to huddle as to whether or not to take my neighbor to jail.
Since it was not his property he was guarding, he was in the wrong. He could have been charged with some serious crimes by the burglars, who have rights, even when committing burglary.
Not sure what to do, they called for a supervisor. Supervisor came, heard all the stories, including my neighbor's who was then in handcuffs.
Supervisor emptied the pump shotgun of all shells onto the ground. He declared, "You can charge this man with nothing. This gun is not loaded." Eyes met and everyone understood.
They unhooked my neighbor, and he got a talking to by the supervisor about rights on HIS property and lack of rights on his NEIGHBOR's property. And a warning next time to just call in and let the police handle it.
The burglars had committed several burglaries in the neighborhood, and were sentenced to a year each.
Sometimes, police do their job, and are reasonable men.
Funny. It seems like it is related a lot to the attitude of the people they are dealing with. I wonder why that is...............
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

Neighbor was not necessarily in the wrong -- he was making a "citizen's arrest", which he is entitled to do if the burglars were committing a felony, or some specific misdemeanors that vary from state to state.
But the supervisor's solution worked pretty good too.
Best regards, Bob <-- not a lawyer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure what it is in your state. Only sure what it was for this story in my state. And, according to the authorities present at the time he WAS "necessarily" wrong. They just applied common sense and fairness to the situation.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

Undoubtedly the threat of deadly force for an unaggravated burglary would be the most likely cause for being on the wrong and why the unloading of the weapon solved the "problem"...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

Don't know how it is in your state, but in mine, you cannot use deadly force to protect property. Not so with the "Make My Day" law states. But that only applies to a man on his OWN property.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote: ....

Isn't that essentially what I suggested???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't tell. You didn't post the relevant conversation, and I don't want to go back and look it up.
I was getting from your inference that all a person had to do was ">>>>>>>>>", and I said that might be true where you live, but not true where I live, and not true where someone else lives.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

I made no statement that anyone "had to" do anything nor that any particular action would be generically true--simply stated that the use of deadly force in a situation of only nonaggravated burglary was would be a likely reason for there being fault <IN THE INSTANCE OF THE STORY TOLD>. Any further inference drawn was yours, not mine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 15 Aug 2005 12:18:16 -0700, "SteveB"

middle of October there will be a test case. They don't say you can use deadly force to protect property but they do say you can use deadly force to protect yourself and you do not have the obligation of retreat anywhere you have a right to be. This puts you on par with the cops. They can't shoot a fleeing felon but they can interpose their body in the direction of flight and shoot the felon if they think the person presents a threat of imminent bodily harm. I really think the CCW holders will need another step in their training to sort this out but it does give someone more latitude in confronting a person committing a non-forceable felony. Forceable felons were always covered by the CCW law.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I must keep up on this, as I am licensed in Florida. Utah and Nevada call them permits, Florida calls it a license.
That's the trouble. You have to go every five years to take a refresher course, and this stuff changes every week. And each city, county, state, and borough has its own laws that supercede one another.
So, what do you do? As I posted, and so many disagreed with, you just about have to let them kill you before you shoot. And one size does not fit all, and what one does in his state/county/city may not be legal in another.
And we can all talk about it and talk about it. But the only things that matter are what each person does when it happens, and the decisions from the court when it happens.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

In Florida,you can use deadly force to stop a "forcible felony". In the Florida concealed weapon permit pamphlet I have right here at hand,it says burglary is a "forcible felony". It does not specify on one's own property. This pamphlet is current,not effective come October.
http://licgweb.doacs.state.fl.us/weapons/index.html
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in Indiana, a citizen may use deadly force to stop a break-in at *A* residence. Not necessarily his *own* residence. There was a case in Indianapolis some years back, where a homeowner shot a guy trying to break into the house next door. Reporters wondered why the shooter wasn't charged; prosecutor said "nothing to charge him with."
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

He wasn't using deadly force to protect property. He was using threat of deadly force to detain the burglars he caught-in-the-act until the police he summoned got there. I don't know if that's OK in his state or not, but it is a quite different issue. The police at the scene could have been wrong too, and since it didn't go before a judge we'll never know. (I suspect is was a proper arrest.) But the story had a happy ending anyway because the supervisor had enough sense to unload the shotgun and let the guy go -- so the actual details of the law were a moot point and justice prevailed.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greetings,
If "using threat of deadly force to detain the burglars caught-in-the-act until the police [arrive]" is in fact illegal then all of us here, as well as the police supervisor and the neighbor, appear to believe that the law is unjust. We are therefore happy with the outcome (the law wasn't enforced).
The problem I see with this is that the majority of the citizens in the state believe otherwise. In my opinion those citizens are, to say the least, "misguided." Still, in their minds, the thieves were just after money when the neighbor was risking their LIFE. This is not a case of the supervisor showing leniency; this is a case of the supervisor disregarding the moral code of the citizens of the state in favor of his own moral code (*which I happen to agree with this time).
I had an instance where someone was defecating in the back yard of one of my properties and smoking crack there. The house was broken into during this time period. A few days later I came in the early morning and found someone asleep in the back yard about 6 feet from a no trespassing sing. I called the police expecting them to charge the individual with trespass, defecating on my lawn, and possibly the break in if they could find any evidence. Instead the police just asked the individual to leave. I asked them why they didn't at least charge them with trespass and they told me it was because the individual couldn't pay. In this case I disagreed with the decision of the police.
I was furthermore the object of much hatred from the neighbors when the person sleeping in my back yard supposedly later died of exposure and my response was that the police should have arrested them.
William
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.