OT: difference between scooter and cordless drill motor?

Electric powered scooters have motors like this.
http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/razorama_1911_2198387
What's the difference between that and modern cordless drill motor?
Size and weight? Obviously cordless drill motors are smaller/lighter. Is that due to higher quality and miniaturization? Or do scooter motors have to be big/heavy?
Power and efficiency?
I'm wondering why a scooter motor has a DC motor controller with a big aluminum heatsink. What sort of motor controller does a modern cordless drill include? Why doesn't it require the same?
Apparently cordless drill motors are powerful, at least the way they are geared. Scooter motors use a belt/chain.
As far as I can tell, given the revolutions per minute, the speed using either motor would be about the same (the scooter motor as assembled and the cordless drill motor driving a wheel directly from the chuck).
What about back pressure on the drill motor? Usually that doesn't happen like with a scooter motor.
I don't necessarily need all that answered, any comments or insights are welcome.
Thank you.
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John Doe wrote:

Check 'dis one out!
http://www.dpxsystems.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ID 4
They are pushing all sorts of "drill powered" systems...
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Very cool, thanks. That sort of plug-in implementation has crossed my mind. Also possible is to use a larger battery, if necessary placed in a remote location.

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John Doe wrote:

However, on the other end of the spectrum, this guy must have cojones the size of pumpkins. And he's a Stanford grad no less...
http://www.ronpatrickstuff.com /
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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wrote:

I wonder about the duty cycle of cordless drill motors when used in a scooter application. Drill/drivers are used intermittently,not continous run like a scooter. I suspect a scooter motor would have better cooling and less heat buildup.
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Jim Yanik
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I think their applications are long and intense enough.
But I do wonder why a scooter DC motor controller has such a big heat sink and the cordless drill equivalent is nowhere in sight. I'm hoping that's partly due to a drill's greater motor/system quality. They certainly cost a lot more.
Overheating is possible when power is being applied inefficiently, when the motor is not turning.
Power, gearing, and a clutch might help defeat any overheating, all available on modern cordless drills.
A related concern is just the continuous runtime, but a high-quality drill with occasional cleaning and brush replacement should do. Will see.
Given enough power, my main electrical concern is back pressure on the drill's electric brake. It might take much longer to slow down the RPMs, but I suspect that's not a problem.
Generally speaking, about cordless drill powered recreational/commuter devices:
Apparently Milwaukee's 28 V cordless right angle drill (at about $350) might be very good for the application but at over 1000 inch pounds of torque it might even be overkill power wise.
After spending significant money, you would expect it to be modular and used for other purposes, like drilling.
Drills are designed for ruggedness, which fits the application. Should avoid getting it wet though.
Cordless drill battery technology is constantly improving. Many cordless drills come with 3 amp hour nickel metal hydride (NiMH) or lithium-ion (Li-Ion) batteries which can be recharged 1000/2000 times.
A modern cordless drill/driver has what looks to me like some neat built-in features for the application.
... gearing, helps adjust for terrain, also allows for a larger/smaller drive wheel, would be even better if the gears could be switched on the fly, but oh well
... a clutch, should help prevent overheating, might also help prevent destabilizing the rider
... an electric brake, that might provide built-in braking if it's powerful enough and doesn't ruin the drill, maybe it will run like a souped-up car :)
Have fun.
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