OT carburetor question

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On Oct 26, 3:10 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Ok, it is like lye then...remember the little pieces of aluminum in DrainO? If you're holding it in your hand...you won't care much whether it is an acid or a base! bob_v
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.
One time I used lye to remove the remnants of a seized piston arm from a crank journal. I believe it was an 8 HP Tecumseh on a snowblower. It cleaned-up without adding further damage.
bob_v
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 05:45:15 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

Oven cleaner is Caustic, not an acid.
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Hmm. Sounds like some wisdom, there.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Oct 26, 8:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Da...I think this was covered!
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I had an idiot use oven cleaner to clean the condensing unit on a make line at a pizza place. Later the unit failed and when I opened the control box, the cleaner had gotten inside on the wiring, damaging it and allowing all the magic smoke to escape.
TDD
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Works some what, for cleaning condensors if you don't get the wiring wet. Doesn't have the penetrating ability of a good garden sprayer, though. Some condensors are three inches thick.
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the wiring wet.
Isn't that what he just stated?
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Yes. Is that a concern?
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On Oct 28, 10:11 am, "Stormin Mormon"

It should be to you...if you want to "sound" intelligent.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We used to use Brulin. It's illegal now I think. Anything that works good is illegal now.
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wrote:

Back in the '50s we used to rebuild the old Plymouth's carb every year. Took it to a local mechanic and he would charge a small sum to soak it overnight in his dip tank. However, all of the instructions I've read recently on rebuilding small carbs...lawn mower, outboard motor, snow blower, etc....caution against using that type of cleaner as they claim it will dissolve some small parts in the carb that are best left alone. A spray cleaner, only is recommended.
Tom.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 11:12:12 -0500, "Tom G"

I wouldn't dip a whole carburetor but the main casting is just aluminum and brass. These little weed eater and chain saw carbs are real easy to take apart but the main jet is virtually impossible to get to for cleaning. They are really only about $50 on the net and that will certainly fix the problem but it seems like a waste.
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I'm with you. Seems like a waste, if the metering jet is the only thing wrong.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 16:11:59 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I had 2 with exactly the same symptom (start, won't run) and both would not flow fuel from the chamber with the diaphragm and inlet needle through the metering jet. I got one open and things were fine. The other is still hopelessly plugged. I bought a carb and fixed that one. I would still like to fix the original for a spare.
I did figure out how all that fuel flow works on those little 2 strokes so it was a good learning experience. It is not really much like the car carbs or boat carbs I have done all my life. The primer bulb actually sucks fuel thorough the system and pumps it back into the tank. The stuff under the "big screw" end is the fuel pump and the "4 screw" end is the reservoir for the main metering jet.
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 16:39:08 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Definitely not a diaphragm issue? I've heard that they can stretch over the years and stop pumping properly...
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 18:02:02 -0500, Jules

The jet is definitely plugged. Having 2 carbs that are basically the same is a handy trouble shooting tool. You can compare what happens when you shoot carb spray in each hole. BTW in my foray through the net I heard several times not to blow out these things until you take it apart, particularly the "big screw" side since that is where the fuel pump is and you will blow the little check valves (just flaps of mylar)
The way I finally cleared the jet I could blow open (another carb) was to plug one end of the venturi with a test tube size rubber stopper, fill it with lacquer thinner and blow air in the other side. Do this outside and use a face shield. I had the whole thing wrapped in a shop towel and it still blew thinner everywhere. (150PSI air). It did blow the jet open tho. The other one, no joy. Plugged solid.
I am going to try soaking in carb cleaner now that I have my machine going with a new carb and when I think I have the old one fixed I am going to swap it back. Then I know I have a good hot spare. Yes I will be sure I blow all the gas out ;-)
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:41:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Try soaking in "SeaFoam" - buy it at NAPA
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:41:10 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Heh, yeah. I've got a couple of 'em here (little Walbro things) that were DoA but _seem_ to have clear pathways. Problem is they'd both been screwed around with before I inherited them, so the mixture settings were a mess, but there's also no guarantee that someone didn't screw with the needle valve settings.
I got one to the stage where it'll run, but has a habit of dying after 5-10 minutes - but I can immediately start it up and get another few minutes out of it. Something's obviously not doing its thing right, but I don't know if it's pump or needle (I don't think it's mixture, not when it runs that long before flaking out)
The other one's still sick - it'll do that thing where it'll start and hold idle, but die as soon as the throttle's opened, no matter what the mixture setting, so I wonder if that one's got a partial blockage somewhere.
One day I'll motivate myself to treat one of them to a new needle and diaphragm set and see where I get... it's too cold here now to be playing with them until April or so, though :-)

Yeah, that makes sense if yours are anything like mine - it'd probably do more harm than good. Thankfully they come apart (mostly) pretty easily :-)
cheers
Jules
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I've heard of Briggs and Stratton diaphragms harden up, and don't pump properly. Pulsa - Jet comes to mind.
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