OT and further to cutting hole in glass bottle!!!


With my apology for OT.
I have a section of the shore portion of the first Transatlantic 'Telephone' cable (Not Cyrus Fields 1850s 'Telegraph' cable) that went into operation in 1956 between Oban Scotland and Shoal Harbour Newfoundland. I picked it up personally as a scrap item, at a repeater site (Of the Newfoundland to North Sydney, Nova Scotia, portion), in 1956.
Wish to slice the short section, a few inches long, into thin slices and mount each 'slice' (probably by gluing?) on small plaques to make a presentation item; to telecommunication industry retirees etc..
Could anyone suggest best method and or direct to a 'hobbyist/model- makers' news group for advice.
Thank you for your forbearance of my question; but there is so much help and knowledge/skill available here. Many thanks.
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try rec.crafts.metalworking
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Might be a job for one of those diamond saws used to slice stones. (Might clog up with any plastic though?) Do you have a "gem and mineral" type club in your area?
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you cannot use a diamond blade with metals or plastics. i suspect to get a good slice out of a cable, a very large metal shear is required for this task.
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Or you may have to soak the end in thin penetrating epoxy solution to "fix" the wires in the cable in place so they don't move while cutting nor fall out when mounting. It may only penetrate a short distance requiring repeated treatments. Once it is hardened solid a very fine saw may be used to cut slices and the solid slice may even allow some sort of polishing technique to highlight the copper wires and the coloured plastic or rubber or whatever they used for insulation.
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terry wrote:

Go to a coin collector shop, or look online for coin holders. They have clear plastic coin holders, some even egravable, that would do just what you want. Solid front, solid back, and a round cutout section in the middle to hold the coin-shaped object.
-- aem sends...
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It's the centre core of the cable. The entire cable would have had variuos outer layers of twisted steel 'armour'. The amount of armour would have varied; less in deeper water, where the danger of damage is less and more in shallower water where greater danger of ice damage and/or being hooked/danged by fishing gear; especially 'dragging'. The electrical portion (which is to be presented, is a coaxial cable. The section has a heavy lead outer sheath about one inch (or slightly more) in diameter. Within that are a central copper conductor contained within a metal tube with with variuos 'layers' of insulation, separating each 'concentric layer'. Many thanks for the variuos suggestions. Am hoping to get variuos 'slices' of the section with reasonably smooth surface and mount them as presentation item. That analog multi channel cable is now out of service, having been long replaced by variuos fibre-optic 'cables'. Each with much higher capacity than all of the previous 'telephone' cables! This in much same way that after the telephone cable went into service ALL of the previous Transatlantic 'telegraph' cable capacity could be carried by only one of the 24 voice channels of the then new 'telephone' cable. Thanks for reading. PS. Am just a few miles from where in 1901 Marconi received the first Transatlantic 'wireless' telegraph signal from England.
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Are you a former Bell Labs employee or a Former AT+T Long Lines person?
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