Opinions on combining bathrooms? Effect on selling house?

Anyone want to offer his or her opinion on whether a small bathroom in the master BR of a house will be a hindrance to selling?
Off my master BR, there's a *tiny* 3/4 bath, 4 1/2 ft x 5 ft, with a 2 1/2 ft x 2 1/2 ft shower stall on the end. It's adequate for a single guy, but I can't picture a couple using that one bathroom.
Adjacent to that bathroom, off the hallway, is a full bath, about 7ft x 8ft including the tub alcove. Not huge, but a person can at least dry off without bumping elbows against the wall.
Since the two bathrooms are right next to each other, I've been wondering how it would work out to do a major remodel, taking down the wall and combining the two bathrooms. Still wouldn't be a huge, luxurious bathroom, but might at least be big enough for a bigger vanity with two sinks and a whirlpool tub.
Two disadvantages: Combining with the main floor bathroom means I'd either have to give up the private entrance from the master BR, OR have two doors into the bathroom, one from the BR and one from the hall (something I've never liked when I've seen it in other houses). The other disadvantage might be that the house would list as having 2 bathrooms rather than 3! (There is one 3/4 bath in the finished basement. If that's the way it really works. Currently one full, two 3/4 baths, so it would list as a 2 1/2 bath house? But if I combined, it would be 1 3/4 baths?
So there's the tradeoff of a tiny master bath that would turn away a lot of buyers vs. a house that appears to have fewer bathrooms.
Whaddya think???
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The change would never pay for itself even if people liked the idea. It is really a personal decision. Alot depends on the neighborhood and comparable houses.

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if it was me, if you're moving leave it alone. if you're staying, remodel to your desires. for all the information you have included, the local real estate broker and every particular about your entire house and the local demand is also a matter of matching the unknown buyer's family size to the entire property. sometimes that extra toilet seat helps the sale and sets your home a notch above the competition. if you're wise enough to set this home up for resale, be smart enough to get a certificate of occupancy inspection and bring your entire property into compliance including any permits that may have been overlooked in the plumbing dept. see also our friend al's website in buffalo ny, he sells houses and recommends the updating of kitchens and bathrooms at: http://alryer.com/tips.php
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First, ask a realtor about the difference. If the realtor thinks it's good for sales, I'd consider carefully what Art & Buffalobill have to say. In my area, $200 per square foot is the very minimum for this work. I would suggest $300 as a budget figure. If you're still interested, find an architect. Look for someone who is semi-retired or not otherwise tied to the overhead of an office. (I'm presently on version 16 or 17 of a project like yours. TB
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I agree with the other posters. You never know what a buyer will like. What if you spend all that money and a buyer wants it the other way. Never do any major renovation if you're planning on selling. Just do repairs and cosmetic things(especially to the front of the house). Talk to a realtor.

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Keith Carlson wrote:

First I would not consider it, unless it was being done for me and I planed to keep the home for a long time. I certainly would not expect to recover the cost in a sale. It might even lower the sales price.
I also suggest that you may need to check local codes. Some have some funny regulations.
I would think that most people would want a private bath for the master and a public bath for the first floor, as it is now.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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sorry its a looser $ of a idea...
fewer baths = less resale $$$
unless you have room to add a replacement bath somewhere else?.
or reconfigure both baths making the master bath larger, while leaving a second shower bath or 1/2 bath. thats likely your best option.
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'master baths' were real popular here in the midwest as a cheap way to upscale a house. Sometimes, they even had a second door opening into the little square where the back door and basement door connected to the kitchen. Stall showers were common, often built in place and badly done.
I agree with the others- if it is functional and presentable, and selling it is in the plans, leave it alone- it'll never pay back on resale. If it was a long-term house, look at the total footprint of both baths, and where the services are, and see if there is a logical way to make a more appealing setup. A second W.C., preferably on the same floor, is a BIG selling point for families, especially those with multiple females. In a small house, where the hall bath is 2 steps further, losing the master bath wouldn't be a big deal if there is also a powder room on same floor. (Especially if you make it a 2-roomer, with the W.C. and tub in the back, and a 2-sink vanity up front.) Basement bathrooms are usually only a plus if there is a rec room, bedroom, or walkout down there. Unless there is a walkout or basement bedroom, a basement shower would usually only appeal to guys willing to stumble down there in the morning while the women used the 'real' bathroom.
(Save the flames, I'm not being sexist. Women and men do have different viewpoints about bathrooms, in almost all cases. The textbooks, and my father who has been designing houses for 50 years, agree with me.)
aem sends...
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flames, I'm not being sexist. Women and men do have different viewpoints about bathrooms, in almost all cases. The textbooks, and my father who has been designing houses for 50 years, agree with me.)
aem sends...
i agree men ands women think differently!!!
My idea of reconfiguring the baths to update and make the master more appealing may actually make the home more saleable when the time comes.
Just watch the show house hunters. It amazing what bugs people about a perspective home.
Going from 2 baths would be a real negative.
Realtors say the best use of $$ is updated kitchens and bathrooms, provided you dont blow $$ on luxury...
of course a home is where you live and if your planning on staying a long time you might as well make it nice to you.
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rambler in Minnesota (far West suburbs of Minneapolis). The house is very small compared to what they are building now, less than a mile away.
Thanks for all the feedback (from all). It seems pretty clear that combining would not be a good idea in terms of selling. Would definitely cost some $ because taking out a wall is a bit beyond my capabilities.
I guess I'll probably just look to some improvements in the current bathroom(s). The master bath is small, so maybe taking out the vanity and installing a pedestal sink will visually open things up and help make it seem less cramped. The good thing about the small bathroom is that I could use top-shelf materials and not spend a fortune since I'd need so little of them!
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On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 04:26:57 GMT, "Keith Carlson"

[snip]
I never heard of conjoined twins marrying each other.
That's how you get a couple unable to use the bathroom individually.
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I would think it would lower the value unless your primary future target buyer is a childless or retired couple. If you live in a family neighborhood where the future buyer has or plans on having kids, I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't want to have to go the basement to use the bathroom every time someone is taking a shower or getting ready for work or school.
I don't know how big of a turnoff a small master bath really is. Everyone wants a large master bath with all the trimmings but unless you are looking at new construction (less than 20 years) you are not likely to find it. I would consider the lack of a master bath to be a potential deal killer.
One idea is to redo the master bath with higher grade tile/marble with accent pieces, upgrade the fixtures and shower door (frameless). That is what I did and it can really made a difference.
If you do, I would try to close off the toilet area with a door. That way, two people could use the bathroom at once.
FYI, any bathroom with a shower or tub is consider a full bathroom. Your current house would list as three bathrooms.
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combine the space, make the master bath larger, and the second bath a minimal one, with at most a shower, perhaps take some room from a closet somewhere
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