One cable for internet and TV

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I have a question. There is one cable coming to the room that I have sublet for internet and TV. Every time I wanna use TV I have to unplug the Internet and vice versa. Is there a way to get an aparatus to use both of them at the same time? I am in canada and TV internet cable is rogers
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No. It's impossible. Go back to dialup for internet access.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do you have cable modem?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ask at Home depot for a 'video splitter' or 'cable splitter'. If the signal is already split a lot in your building, there's a chance it may not work. Then you need a (more expensive) signal amplifier.
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On 7 Apr 2006 20:29:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Go get a 1gz splitter. The cable company should give you one tho.
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He'll also need two new, assumably short, lengths of cable to go from the splitter to each device. Let's at least save him that second trip to the electronics store, cursing us for not giving complete information (no, it's not obvious, if you've never done it before).
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 04:57:41 GMT, "Shane Glaseman"

Maybe I'm too used to connecting those things to see it as non-obvious, but you can look at the splitter (while it's still in the package for most) and see that it needs cables on all connectors.
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wrote:

It certainly could just be me. But I've had too much experience telling people "do this," without holding their hand and taking them step-by-step... only to find that they couldn't make leaps that I thought were obvious. Not that the OP here will have that problem, but why not just cover the possibility?
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wrote:

TVs and such that they don't have a drawer full of cables. Just be aware most of the time these "free" cables are junk.
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 12:52:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I really have a lot of cables around, coax, A/V, phone, cat5, etc... I don't automatically throw away things that could be useful.
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Lets not forget that these cables need to be high quality RG-6 or better, not the crappy 30% shielded RG-59 junk with push-on connectors that you get in the box with your VCR, which should be thrown in the junk pile..
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On Sun, 9 Apr 2006 12:22:56 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@tantivy.tantivy.net (Bob Vaughan) wrote:

RG6 or RG59 makes little difference for shorter cables. Push-on connectors are leakier and less physically secure. I always use screw connectors except for short tests. Same for crimped cable ends (with a good crimper).
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I'll agree that at those lengths, the loss of the cable makes litle difference, but what I'm concerned with is the shielding of the cable.
Cable TV is a closed system.. it uses the same frequencies within the system that are also used by other users of the RF spectrum. Using inadequately shielded cables can lead to interference to the cable tv signal from outside sources, and more importantly, can lead to the cable tv system causing interference to the outside services, which can include public safety, broadcast media, cellphones, amateur radio, etc.
Bottom line: use high quality low-loss cables, preferably with double or quad shielding, and 95-100% shield coverage.
--
-- Welcome My Son, Welcome To The Machine --
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On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:43:27 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@tantivy.tantivy.net (Bob Vaughan) wrote:

And keep the shield complete at the connectors. The twist-on connectors can do a poor job of that. There was an obvious improvement when I started using the crimped ones.
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they'll probably hand you a splitter and some connecting cables at your cable company.
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I have a splitter and a switching splitter. A switch may or may not be needed to keep signal strength high. Call the cable company to see what they recommend. Any hardware store should have what you need to make unplugging unesesary.
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I have been reading this thread - and have what may be a dumb question...
Does the same cable that connects to TVs also provide internet service in the USA too? We have cable (Bright House) for TV but it is basic service so there is no box with it...we just hook up the TV to the cable. In another room, we have a cable with modem for the internet (Road Runner)...and it is connected to a router which is then connected to the computer. I had no idea the same cable could do both things. If we wanted to hook up a TV to the RR cable, could we do that? I mean, buy a splitter, or perhaps figure out a way to setup a wireless connection to the TV.? Just wondering.
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on it. YOu can take your cable modem and hook it to any TV connection in the house or you could take any TV and hook it to the wire going to the cable modem. The only place you may run into problems is if there are splitters or amplifiers in the lines. The cable modem usually needs a higher level than the TV does to work. Also the amplifiers may be one way amplifiers and will not work on the internet.
In otherwords the cable comming into the house has all the signals on it. Usually a single splitter is used to send the maximum signal direct to the internet modem and the other side of the splitter is then sent to all the TV sets and other splitters for them if more than one TV is in use.
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On 8 Apr 2006 12:12:55 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Yes, but you would only see 1's and 0's.
In various sequences.
Actually, I think it depends on the way the provider has it set up. In Dallas I think there are two cables coming into the house, but apparently in that part of Canada, there is only one.

I think you could only use a router for tv for any digital stations on the cable, and not for any other stations. All of the internet is digital (1's and 0's) so it works.
BTW, I was kidding in my first line above. You would see some mixture of black and white dots or areas, parts might look different shades of grey, I think, but they wouldn't actually be the numbers one or zero.
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wrote:

Cable internet is on low VHF (the same basic band as Ch 2-6) on Comcast in SW Florida. It all comes in on one cable. Compared to old style TV the internet is not that much bandwidth. NTSC TV is a bandwidth hog. That is why the cable company is pushing digital.
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