On space heaters

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I read an article recently claiming that space heaters in the bedroom didn't really save money in that the cost of electricity to run them costs far more than central heating.
I was skeptical of that assertion.
A few years ago, I installed a window a/c unit and was shocked at how much my electric bill went down!
Anyway, a couple of months ago, I bought a small, ancient, GAS space heater for ten bucks at an auction. Over the last couple of weeks, I managed to get gas piped from the meter to the bedroom wall Luckily, the master bedroom wall and the meter are on the same side of the house, about 14 feet apart.
I then fired up the heater and, Lord, does that sucker put out the heat !
My additional aim is to continue the piping to the back of the house and around the corner so that I can convert my portable generator to tri-fuel instead of having to rely on gasoline.
Point is, even if the original article was correct (which I doubt), there may be alternatives to heating the whole house - other than the central unit - for eight hours while you sleep.
Of course all this is a worthless endeavor on my part if we never again experience cold weather ...
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On 11/26/2012 5:14 PM, HeyBub wrote:

HB you are a very intelligent gent and I know you realize the dangers of CO perhaps coming from an unventilated old style heater in a closed room. If you're going to run the gas line to your genset, check with your gas company about the availability of a 2psi gas service. You would have to put a regulator on the line feeding your little heater to bring the pressure down to 6-8"WC and the existing feed to any other gas appliances but the 2psi supply would insure plenty of NG for your genset and you won't need to run as large a diameter pipe to get the same volume. When I was doing remodel work with my friend GB, we always got a 2psi meter installed and ran 1/2" gas line instead of 1" which saved a lot of money. ^_^
TDD
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Why do people call small heaters such as this gas one, or the portable electric ones "SPACE HEATERS"? I've never yet heard of any astronaut using one of them to heat "outer space". And if your house is attached to a foundation on the earth, you are NOT IN SPACE!!!! (Even if you might think you are in space from the drugs you took).
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These folks sure needed space heaters. http://www.negrospaceprogram.com / Rated R, for brief crude language.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Why do people call small heaters such as this gas one, or the portable electric ones "SPACE HEATERS"? I've never yet heard of any astronaut using one of them to heat "outer space". And if your house is attached to a foundation on the earth, you are NOT IN SPACE!!!! (Even if you might think you are in space from the drugs you took).
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

1. Pipe's already in place - it's a 1" line directly from the meter. 2. A properly adjusted, i.e., enough oxygen, space heater does not generate CO. I grew up in a home heated exclusively by NG space heaters and there's nothing wrong with me - except for a squishy, fungating mass on my upper left leg that I've had since about the age of six. 3. As for the 2psi service, wouldn't I have to put a regulator on all the gas appliances? That is, water heater, dryer, furnace?
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On 11/27/2012 9:16 PM, HeyBub wrote:

When I was installing a lot of gensets in homes we got the 2psi meter installed by the gas company and the original line feeding the house got a regulator to keep it at the normal 6 to 8 inches water column pressure. We tapped off the 2psi side going to a separate regulator for the genset which needed a pressure of 11"wc to operate properly. Depending on the manufacturer's specifications, your genset or modification kit may or may not work with 6-8"wc pressure. When me and GB were doing remodels, we used 2psi as the distribution pressure and had to put a regulator on each appliance. The regulators are not that expensive and the labor cost of running smaller flexible gas lines was much less than running large diameter threaded black pipe. I believe the gasoline genset I modified for one customer used a kit that operated just fine with the standard 6-8"wc pressure and it was a 5kw portable contractor type generator with the 5gal gas tank on top. ^_^
TDD
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lemme guess, you bought an old Dearborn heater, didn't ya? I got one in the shop and yes, they do put out some heat and I've never had it on high ever. Damn fine heaters those old Dearborn are.
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HB-
As oyu have seen...it all depends on the circumstances.
That article that issued a blanket condemnation of space heat (electric or gas) vs central heat is clearly wrong. Spot heating or cooling can often be LOTS cheaper than central heat or cooling.
What makes better sense?
A single person is in a 2800 sq ft house where the outside temp is 28F....
1) heat the whole house with propane fired FAU or 2) heat a single room with a couple 1500 watt oil filled space heaters
The correct solution would change if one needed to heat all 5 bedrooms....
The same thinking would apply in a cooling environment.
cheers Bob
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Choice #3 --- Wear flannel pajamas and have a 100 watt electric blanket.
I prefer the oil filled heater over any type with a fan, as it has always been the fan which eventually quits and the heater shuts off. While it's easy to remove and disassemble the fan, clean and oil the bearings, and get them going for another few years, the oil heater relies on medium temp over a large surface and isn't as much of a fire hazard. Just my opinion, tho.
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wrote:

Heating a single room in a house in an area with real winters may result in lower fuel costs but it can be disastrous in the long run. That single room will not have insulation between it and the other rooms so the small heater may not really work well. Also, when temperatures drop below freezing, humidity from living in the house will migrate to the cold rooms and condense on cold surfaces, causing damage to finishes and allowing mould to grow.
If one wants to chop the heating bill, he could set the central heat on low to maintain some heat throughout the building, and then run electric heaters in the occupied rooms to boost the temperature to a comfortable level. However, this will all depend on the fuel used for the central heat and the cost of electricity in your are. For example, I live in Canada and we get real winters. My gas bill is only $600.00 per year for heat, hot water and cooking, but my electric bill is $350.00 per month, so I would never want to run an electric heater except in an emergency.
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I'd wonder about the pipes in the walls. On the cold side of the building.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Heating a single room in a house in an area with real winters may result in lower fuel costs but it can be disastrous in the long run. That single room will not have insulation between it and the other rooms so the small heater may not really work well. Also, when temperatures drop below freezing, humidity from living in the house will migrate to the cold rooms and condense on cold surfaces, causing damage to finishes and allowing mould to grow.
If one wants to chop the heating bill, he could set the central heat on low to maintain some heat throughout the building, and then run electric heaters in the occupied rooms to boost the temperature to a comfortable level. However, this will all depend on the fuel used for the central heat and the cost of electricity in your are. For example, I live in Canada and we get real winters. My gas bill is only $600.00 per year for heat, hot water and cooking, but my electric bill is $350.00 per month, so I would never want to run an electric heater except in an emergency.
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On Nov 27, 11:32am, "Stormin Mormon"

i know a fellow who tired of paying for natural gas.........
he walled off a tiny part of his home and tried heating with electric space heaters, his electric bill went thru the roof, natural gas was far cheaper.....
the freeze thaw ruined the drywall, inside the home pipes needed heat tape, drain lines froze, basically he ruined his home, people who have been inside say it will need gutted, if not torn down...
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On 11/27/2012 11:02 AM, bob haller wrote: ...

Ah, yes, the inevitable "Bob knew" story... :)
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Don't forget the clincher "people said..."
Harry k
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On 11/27/2012 11:33 AM, Harry K wrote:

By his tales of "know neighbor, etc." Haller is apparently the carrier of every disaster known to ancient and/or modern man--if he ever moves to your neighborhood, you had best move posthaste 'cuz pestilence and other assorted ills are sure to arrive w/ the locusts... :)
--
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Must be true? Heard it from Madge, the hair dresser?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Don't forget the clincher "people said..."
Harry k
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Wierdly I know lots of people, many friends of friends... This particular fellow has been a garbage collector and has 2 acres full of scrap metal. odd thing scrap price is never high enough for him, so he never sells.
meanwhile neighbor kids steal some and the town cites him for the overgrown mess.
his entire family is wierd
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On 11/27/2012 2:58 PM, bob haller wrote:

And bring trouble to them all, apparently... :)
--
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Odd, I grew up in Northern Idaho - moved through...um 5 houses - all had no heat in the bedrooms and living areas heated with a wood stove. Not one sign of mold, condensation as your claim anywhere except the windows. Temps werecommon at 20 below and 40 below was not unknown.
Quite comfortable sleeping in cold rooms with enough blankets. Harry K

Or don't run any heat in the bedrooms. Use electric blankets if you just can't stand using a pile of blankets.
Harry K
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One year I supplemented my bedroom with electric heat from oil type heater. Setting on 500 watts was enough, plus thermostat control. I'm fine with supplemental heat, except fan heaters are a problem. I also have used radiant types in living room for a nice feel. Anything blowing into the Heater or falling on, is hazardous. My brother uses three 1500 watt heaters to heat his house, which is cheaper than using his oil furnace. It's often too hot for me.
Greg
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