oil vs. electric heat

Page 2 of 2  
Thanks for all the tips, people. Electricity would have ended up being 2-3 times more expensive than oil. Given my options I went with a new oil heater. In terms of water vs. air, the only systems in stock were water, and we needed something asap. My house is now toasty, and 95% efficiency to boot.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you don't mind, how much did it cost you? I think I'm going to be faced with that in the next couple of years. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
All told, it cost $3500. The boiler itself was $1400, but we had extra cost replacing most of the surrounding pumps (very old) and some of the immediate pipes coming in and out of the unit. Labor was the most expensive part of it, but after shopping around these guys were offering the best price. Hopefully we won't have to do anything like that again for 30-40 years (unless the world runs out of oil... :}).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's a shame. Glad you found a solution, but unfortunately you might be ripping it out in few years when oil is up to 5$/gallon. Good luck!
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you think electricity (that uses a lot of oil for generation) will be much cheaper? What would you do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That depends on where you live. In most regions, you can buy electricity that is generated using renewable sources. In PA, where I live, you can pay 7.25 cents/kwh instead of 6.5 cents/kwh and buy electricity that is from 100% renewable sources. This funds further investment in renewable sources of energy.
However, to answer your your assertion directly
"Base load electricity currently is supplied by generators using coal (50 percent), nuclear power (20 percent), hydro (9 percent) and oil (3 percent). Of the remaining electricity on the grid, 18 percent is provided by natural gas (16 percent) and the renewables (2 percent)"
(http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/article.cfm?IdX1 )
See also the official DOE numbers: http://www.eia.doe.gov/kids/infocardnew.html
So the actual percentage of U.S. electricity coming from foreign oil is actually very low. The coal, hydro and nuclear, we produce domestically so it is less at the mercy of foreign suppliers (and ultimate supply / demand problems of oil). There's no simple answer.
Unfortunately, the original poster was in a bind, and had to get a system ASAP because they were without heat. Also, I believe, they already had oil hot water so installing new ductwork etc would have been a PITA. In their shoes, I might have gone with conventional heat pump if they had an A/C with ducting already. If they didn't? That's a tough call. I'd have to see their exact situation to make an intelligent suggestion.
I am putting my money where my mouth is. I have oil hot water and baseboard heaters and a conventional A/C. I am in the final stages of arranging to have a ground source heat pump installed and have already ordered my electricity to be switched over to the 100% renewable source.
I should add that I wasn't trying to be a wise ass in my reply. It is truly a shame that anybody has to go with oil these days because I sincerly think that their oil bills are going to go from maybe $1500 last year to $3000 next year (based on my last couple year's average consumption of about 1500 gallons/year) to $6000 in maybe 3-4 years.
In addition, I am planning some renovations to my home and will be adding a completely solar heated shop and will be using the excess heat to heat my domesting hot water supply, further reducing my overall energy impact.
I should also add that I am not any sort of radical environmentalist. I simply feel that the 10 year payback of these systems will by far exceed the expenses AND I believe that the "oil peak" will render most of the oil based items cost ineffective.
that's my 2 cents.
Cheers!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
041107 1717 - Edwin Pawlowski posted:

Probably not, but it wouldn't matter with a coal fired power plant...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi axis, hope you are having a nice day
On 05-Nov-04 At About 07:00:11, axis wrote to All Subject: oil vs. electric heat
a> house isn't huge -- our plumber said we'd be good with a 96k btu a> unit, although he suggests a 125k just to have some extra kick.
The first thing I would do is get rid of that plumber. he doesn't know what he is talking about. The only way to figure out what size is needed is to run a manual J on the house. and bigger is not better. the right size is more efficient and will save you money on the fuel bill.
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. The whole world is about three drinks behind.
___ TagDude 0.92+[DM] +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ spam protection measure, Please remove the 33 to send e-mail
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.