Oil Furnace problems - need help

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Use a basement tank, in a containment "cistern", with a float alarm.
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Total overkill

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Once you realize that it could cost you $6K to $8 to switch to gas, you're probably going to stick with oil, because you said it was a pretty new furnace. You can't be screwing around looking into other types of fuel systems. You need to get someone out ASAP to pressure test that tank. If you went from 350 to 1100 gallons a year, it's a good bet it's leaking. The cost of removing a leaking tank can be very costly. There are companies who do only tank testing. The thing to do right now, is to get a basement tank installed and pump the existing oil into it before one of your neighbors starts getting an oil smell in their house, or oil in their well water. I hope you understand how serious this could be.

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Yes, I agree, Bob. Super serious. That is why I stated before it is scaring me. I am having someone to come and test it. They are supposed to be here next week. I am also having someone come and give me an estimate on installing a basement tank. Again, I need to be super careful with that as well. I don't want to end up with many many gallons of oil in my basement (because that is my luck).
I'll keep y'all posted! You guys are the best! Helped me keep my sanity and keep me from jumping into a bigger mess.
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Sorry for scaring you, but that's what I was trying to do. As for your oil tank: 1) Make sure the fill and vent are NOT plastic pipe. 2) If possible, install a whole new oil line, and do not use the old oil line from the old tank. 3) Try to get an installer who is also capable of servicing your heater. 4) If they pump the oil from the old tank into the new one, make sure they don't pump too much sludge with it. 5) Dig up the old tank and get it hauled away, no matter how much it costs.

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Ok...one last set of questions...the basement tanks...can you get them in different materials, ie. fiberglass, metal.
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have any problems.
Fiberglass ones are expensive....
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Have you ever seen a totally fiberglass inside oil tank?

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The most common tank is a 275 gallon steel 27" x 44" oval x 60"long. Another tank is cubical shaped steel with molded polyethylene inside (for about 3x the cost of an oval tank). 275 gallons of oil weighs about 2200 lbs. That's a lot of weight, and I think steel is about the only thing strong enough to withstand that kind of pressure.

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