New Sump Pump Stored 7.5 years

I decided to replace my still-working but aging sump pump with one (1/3 hp Wayne CDU790) that I got 7.5 years ago and kept stored in its original packaging.
When I took the pump out of the original box, I noticed a small amount (probably less than an ounce) of oil in the discharge volute. My fear is that the motor seal has weakend from being on the shelf for so long.
I'd appreciate opinions on whether the pump is too risky, either mechanically or electrically, to install.
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Erma1ina wrote:

Under what conditions was the pump stored. In a hot attic, a cool dry place or an outbuilding?
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

It was stored in a cabinet in my unfinished basement which ranges in temperature from about 60 degrees in winter to about 75 degrees in summer with a pretty constant 40 - 50 percent humidity.
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Erma1ina wrote:

If it had been a hot attic, I would be very concerned. You certainly stored it properly. Is there a local pump shop or electric motor repair company in your area? If so, you might ask them what they would charge to check the pump out. It's a good pump and most people think highly of them. I've seen them priced from $90-$150 new and $60 for a factory reman. I would find out the cost of a seal replacement verses new pump. The local shop may check it for you at no charge and be able to tell you if the seal is bad. In my area we have some good motor and pump shops that will check out a pump like yours at no charge and repair them economically.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

In addition to storage in a hardware-friendly environment, is there anything else that would help keep a spare pump in ready shape?
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Bryce wrote:

If I had a spare pump, I would test run it once a year. Heck, you can have a defective pump that's brand new. The sump pump systems I've worked on in industrial applications are often setup in pairs and have a control system that will run each pump alternately. If one pump fails, there is no flooding. I've seen homes that have two pumps, one pump is installed higher than the other. That type of installation is good for backup or unusual situations where more water than normal comes in.
TDD
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wrote:

all pumps, spare or in service, should be run for at least a few seconds say once a month so that the bearings don't sieze up..
Mark
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions, Daring Dufas.
I checked with my local plumber who thinks it should be OK. Also, taking your advice, I called a local electric motor repair shop who said they'd be able to check it out for about $10.
The pump seems to work just fine - I ran through several sump loads to watch it and listen to it. I've got another, identical pump on order and, when it arrives, I'll install it IMMEDIATELY after cycling the "stored" pump through a few more loads. Then, I'll let the "stored" one sit and check it after a month or so to see if more oil has leaked. If it hasn't, I'll just rotate the 2 pumps yearly so that I always have a backup. If more leaked, I'll take it in to the shop to have them check it out and, if need be and it's worth it, have them repair it.
Thanks again.
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Why not test it? Set the pump up in a 5 gallon buckets filled with water and pump the water to another bucket set above it. Set up either a drain hose from the bottom of the top bucket-- or siphon the water from the top one back to the lower one making a closed test system. Balance the input/output so neither runs dry and let her run for a few days. Then you'll now if it's good or not!
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Runtime Error <> wrote:

If his new pump has a bad seal, he could damage the motor. That pump is filled with oil not only for corrosion protection of the motor but for heat transfer.
TDD
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How must did it cost, 40$ or 200. A 40$ pump I would run maybe alot more has gone bad from non use. Bearings, contacts, who knows.
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