New roof or second layer of shingles?


When I was a kid, when we needed a roof my dad would put a second course of shingles over the first, if the plywood was good. Never more than two courses of shingles. Now I need a new roof, and all the estimates I get are from contractors who want to rip off the single course of shingles I have and put new felt, etc. Is there any decent recent for this, or are they just trying to make extra money?
Thanks KM
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ripping off everything gets a better longer life smoother more waterproof job.
Having been thru the add a layer its not worth the $$ saved.
New felt is the real waterproffing, so is new flashing all best done with entire new roof.
When its life is 20 years or more do it right do it once.
At home resale time buyerrs dont like second layers fearing it was a attempted cover up troubles
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ripping off everything gets a better longer life smoother more waterproof job.
Having been thru the add a layer its not worth the $$ saved.
New felt is the real waterproffing, so is new flashing all best done with entire new roof.
When its life is 20 years or more do it right do it once.
At home resale time buyerrs dont like second layers fearing it was a attempted cover up troubles
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ripping off everything gets a better longer life smoother more waterproof job.
Having been thru the add a layer its not worth the $$ saved.
New felt is the real waterproffing, so is new flashing all best done with entire new roof.
When its life is 20 years or more do it right do it once.
At home resale time buyerrs dont like second layers fearing it was a attempted cover up troubles
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If you have standard three tab shingles now, a second layer would work just fine in most cases. It will also be faster and cheaper.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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Overlay may save a few bucks, but when you are spending that much, better to do it right. One formerly reputable company around here pushes the T-lock overlay shingles (aka barn shingles) to almost the exclusion of everything else, because it saves them so much work, and is quick and cheap (for them). Their estimate for an overlay was only about 500 cheaper than the ma'n'pa guy down the street that estimated the job the way <I> specified (total tearoff, refresh flashing, ice shield, add vents, yada yada yada). Guess who I went with. I don't wanna be paying for this again in ten years, assuming I still own the place.
aem sends....
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from a contractors view: He is going to want to do it right the first time {thats if he's any good} his job is to be able to guarantee the work for usually 5 years, he just can't do that not knowing what the underlayment conditions are. If your sure that its good and will last, tell the contractor he doesn't have to guarantee it for the 5 years. Only if your sure! howell mi.
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Beryl wrote:

Best is a total tear off. It helps find weak points epically with flashings. It makes for a better smoother new roof. It also allows for some upgrades like waterproofing under everything for the first few feet in a snow area.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Are they good, solid contractors with excellent rep's?
If so, investigate further. Why do they recommend rip-off? Set the revenue-hustle issue aside for now.
You have very carefully inspected your roof from the outside and (if practical) the inside? You are -sure- there is -no- evidence of deterioration of underlayment, etc??
As mentioned, there's other stuff that merits inspection.
I doubt anyone here can tell you which way to jump. Some folks in the position you describe would be OK with a 2nd layer (long-term). Others wouldn't.
Cheers, Puddin'
"Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." - Bertrand Russell
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Do you have any leaks? (If yes, rip it off) Can you inspect from the underside? Are there any ripples or bubbles in the existing shingles?
It is definitely best to rip the old shingles off. However, there have been MANY successful installs of a second layer of shingles when conditions allow it.
How much will you save? If it is a few percent of the job cost, rip it off.
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wrote:

IMHO,
It can be assumed, more work means more money. So you might take it all with a grain of salt at first. I would suggest that you call your local codes office, and find out if two layers are allowed?
Just a guess.....
tom @ www.MeetANewFriend.com
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