New plasma on wall install....


Hey Guys,
I'm about to install a new plasma on the wall. I've heard that its againts "code" to simply pass the screens power cord in wall... is that correct ? If thats the case, do any of you know the Canadian safety code chapter on this ???
Thanks,
Joe
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Not familiar with Canada, but they do sell wire mold or wire management systems to hide the wire outside the wall. If your outlet is underneath the TV, or closeby, you can install an outlet on the wall behind the TV and use a recessed "clock outlet" to give you an exta inch of space. Thats what I did, but I got lucky since my existing outlet was below the TV I was able to snake a new cable up to the TV.
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MonoPrice sells HDMI cables that are rated for in-wall installation...
You might check with them on the power cord question. Their tech support is pretty good.
http://www.monoprice.com/products/search.asp?keyword=hdmi+in+wall&x=0&y=0
In my case, I bought a flat plastic channel (~4" x 3/4") at HD made for hiding cables.
It mounts flat to the wall and I painted it to match.
I've already had to open it to change cables, so I'm glad it wasn't in the wall.
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I don't think there is any special rating required to run signal cables through walls. It's routinely done with regular HDMI, component video, audio cables, etc. However it's a US code violation to run any kind of extension cord through walls and I would suspect it's probably the same in Canada.
I looked at mounting a LCD TV on the wall and came to the conclusion that for a main viewing location, eg family room, it's just not comfortable to be looking up. I decided to place mine on a stand that leaves it about 2 1/2 feet off the floor.

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On Oct 7, 8:17 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

As per trad's comment.......I toyed with wall mounting but after researching & trying them out (from a viewing point of view), settled on a floor stand that places the center line of both (a 37" and a 42") at about 36".
Like the display for desktop computers, the center line of the TV should be ~ at seated eyeball height. Of course deviation from that height is fine since viewing distances are much further.
Comfortable TV viewing (for long periods of time) depends on having one's head level and looking forward unless the neck is supported by a high back chair or sofa. Having a beer within easy reach is also helpful.
A TV stand greatly simplifies installation as well. BTDT
But to answer your orginal question;
power cord "wall pass through", though quick, simple & easy is a no- no. (But I've done it in certain temporary situations)
The correct way; install a new receptacle or run wire mold. :(
cheers Bob
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wrote:
<snip>

Before I knew running the cord through the wall might be an issue, I did just that. In my case, I have the 46" TV on the wall in the bedroom and the rest of my equipment (Cable box, DVR, Blue-Ray) on the other side of that wall (a walk-in closet). In my installation, one can see the power cord all the way as it travels through the wall. In other words, it is never "hidden" behind wall board. However, technically it is in the wall for the 4" from one side to the other. It that still a problem according to code? If yes, what if I enlarged the hole? If it was 6" in diameter instead of 2", would it then be OK? What if I took that to an extreme and made it like the pass-though "window" we used to have between our kitchen and dining room (2' x 3')? Would that be OK to pass a power cord through?
What if I put 2" diameter conduit through the existing 2" hole thereby sealing the wall interior from the hole. Would that make it OK? It's working just fine, of course, and I don't believe it to be dangerous in any way, but I would rather be code compliant than not.
Thanks, Pat
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On Oct 7, 11:17 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

re: I looked at mounting a LCD TV on the wall and came to the conclusion that for a main viewing location, eg family room, it's just not comfortable to be looking up.
"wall mounting" and "looking up" do not need to go hand in hand.
My 42" TV is wall mounted on a swivle/tilt mount but is also at eye level while seated. We never use the tilt feature, but we often swivel it when there's "extra" people in the room. Flat against the wall it faces my recliner and a love seat where my wife seats when it's just the 2 of us, but we swivel it towards the other couch if we have company or the wife wants to lie on the longer couch.
We see no loss of clarity or color when it's swiveled.
Below the TV we have a "2 column" 3 shelf unit that houses the DVR box, receiver, DVD Recorder, etc. It's really not much higher than it would be if we used the pedestal on top of the shelf unit.
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 22:28:07 -0700 (PDT), 4x12

Put your outlet behind the plasma. I have my theater equipment plugged into a surge protector, and that is on a separate circuit to help prevent interference.
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