need to remove old paint


I have some kitchen cabinets that has paint on the ends where someone painted th wall. How can i get it off without hurting the cabinet ?
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It might help if you told us how the rest of the cabinets are finished.
Different paint removers will do different things to different finishes.
P.S. Why do you post your system specs in a home repair forum?
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On 8/9/2010 7:54 AM, desgnr wrote:

Anesthetize them first. 8-)
TDD
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I post my specs in my signature because i also post to PC forms & they always want to know what you are using & it saves time. The Cabinets are Oak,probally a veneer on the sides & the previous owner got yellow paint on the ends where the cabinet meets the wall & i want to clean it up.
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re: "The Cabinets are Oak,probally a veneer on the sides"
Oak is a wood, not a finish.
Veneer is very thin wood, not a finish.
"probally" is not a word (or a finish). ;-)
Unless you know what the Oak veneer is finished with, it's hard to tell you which paint remover to try.
It would also help if you knew what kind of paint it was - oil vs. latex vs. milk, etc.
I'd start in a very inconspicuous place and use the mildest remover I could find, or even a very gentle scraping, to see what happens.
You could try things like Goof-Off, Zip-Strip, Citrus-solve, 3M Sofest, Rock Miracle, Star 10. Read the label on each to see what it says about its use.
Here's one of many websites that discusses various types of strippers - what they work on and why to be careful with them.
http://www.paintpro.net/Articles/PP303/PP303_strippers.cfm
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desgnr wrote:

Latex or acryllic paint probably would come off easier . try some Formula 409 with a nylon scrubber and test on inconspicuous area first. If the finish is very smoothe, you might try a scraper (very carefully).
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wrote:

re: "...with a nylon scrubber"
If you mean one of the green pads, I'd avoid that method.
http://www.shop3m.com/61500060241.html
I've scratched glass with those green pads. They scare me.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

would help, and I have used the method on wood flooring but certainly would test it first. Helped a neighbor clean up a spray-paint mess that got all over flooring, counters and formica cabinets. The paint was dry and cured, but not very old.
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re: "...with a nylon scrubber"
If you mean one of the green pads, I'd avoid that method.
http://www.shop3m.com/61500060241.html
I've scratched glass with those green pads. They scare me.
Just in case you don't know, those scub pads are color coded by meaness level. Black is the meanest, green is next, the white ones are fairly safe for most surfaces.
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desgnr wrote:

I'd try a SHARP (as in brand new) scraper, either the kind that takes single-edge razor blades, or the kind with a C or U shaped blade that cuts on the pull stroke. If the original finish is intact under the overpaint, and wasn't too porous, the splatters should come right off. You will still do some damage- can't be avoided- but a wipe-on gel stain (I like Minwax, in the bottles that look like suntan oil) of the correct shade will probably fix it 'good enough'. Take your time and go slow, and keep the blade clean. As soon as the blade loses its edge, hone it or put on a fresh one. You want the vee of the cutting edge as close as parallel to surface as possible, so the corners won't dig in.
I'm assuming the surface is actual wood or veneer, and this is not those cheap cabinets with real wood on the front, and the sides and interior are faux wood.
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Since it's wall paint, it's very likely latex. There is a product specifically for removing latex paint. It's available at HD, Lowes, probably local paint/hardware stores etc. Don't remember the name of it, but it's much milder than products like Goof off. I used it to remove some latex house paint from my car bumper and it came right off in minutes.
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