Need some ideas on how to protect my tools from flooding risk

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Yes
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On Thu, 25 Feb 2010 00:33:49 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And a remarkable photo.
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 19:23:17 -0500, gfretwell wrote:

Holding tanks. Very, very big ones ;-)
Wonder if you could flash-boil it off as fast as it was pouring in? ;)
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ransley wrote:

you're missing the fact that the OP stated this is a stilt house. the below the house part is at ground level. there is no place to pump the water to. your idea is like trying to bail a hole in the ocean.
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"Jay Hanig" wrote

Hi Jay. I saw lots of replies too and liked most of them. What I'd look to is a combination.
Build a mini-deck about 6ft up big enough to hold all the heavy tools. Brace this with 4x4 to the cement floor (I am assuming this is possible while still getting the cars in an such, say a long one across the back end and carefully put the supports in so the cars fit between). Reason for bracing this way is long term drag on the 'floor' above if you just support from there. With your skills, this would just be the cost of the wood. Minimal.
Next, just like the others say, rig a pulley system. You may want to have metal posts that set firmly to the floor on large square base and press to the 'floor above'. Properly based and with a level system in them (like a car jack, swivels up until firmly fit which is what they used to support my roof when redoing a damaged enclosed porch into a sunroom).
Best link I found on a search: <http://www.thegreathardwarestore.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCodeS4803&click '44>
http://tinyurl.com/yhv5y6g
These steel posts would not be permanently installed but stored (probably on that platform along the back). Now above them, you run a sturdy 4x6 (may be permanently installed if desired and i'd advise it for ease as you'd have enough to do on evac and don't need to spend time adjusting too much) and rig your pully(s) to that. I'd use a heavy gauge chain on the pulleys.
http://www.southern-tool.com/store/jet_smh_series_hand_chain_hoists.html
Thats a sample but probably much more than you need.
Just wrap the chain up on some sort of brackets in the 'floor above' after spraying well with WD40 (you want them to not rust and will need them every 15 years). If you want to go up 100$ or so, they have electrical pully systems that will lift it for you.
The last step is easy. Have one person climb up on the 6ft tall deck from a ladder (you can even mount one but a regular sort will do) so when you pully up the gear, they can swing it over. If you put a sliding track up for the pulley to run in (going from front to back of the platform), that will be fairly easy.
Oh one last note, expect SWMBO to have the space already packed with rarely used stuff like Xmas decorations and such. Just keep it light enough that you can easily move that to the house proper (grin).
Good ideas?
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On 2/24/2010 6:13 PM, cshenk wrote:

Just so you can understand the layout:
╔═══════╦════╗ │ Car 1 ║ ║ │ ║ S ║ ║ ───┐ ║ H ║ │Stairs O ║ ║ ───┘ ║ P ║ │ Car 2 ║ ║ │ ║ ║ ╚═══════╩════╝
This looks pretty good on my screen; hope it does on yours as well.

While I'm confident of supporting the downward pressure of a jack on the concrete pad particularly with a steel base plate to spread the load, I'm not so sure about the ceiling. I may want to sun some sort of hortizontal steel between two of the pilings. I know the pilings are very stout.

That's a great link. One thing I looked at while I was there was called a "manual lift stacker"... looked like a forklift without the motor. It can raise 1000 lbs up to 63" which would certainly fill the bill. A little pricey at $116 but doable.

No SWMBO here. Got a girlfriend instead. She doesn't get to fill my garage with crap. <G>

Definitely food for thought. There's several ways to go. Thanks to everyone who answered.
Jay
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wrote:

Choices:
- I-Beam, proper distance
- .25 inch steel phish <sp> plate. 12" X 20'. A shop may only sell twenty feet of steel -minimum.
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 21:23:48 -0500, Jay Hanig wrote:

That's possibly the best ASCII art drawing I've ever seen on usenet :-)
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Came over nicely here too, but I dont know what your letters mean. I'm assuming they represent some sort of structural posts and you drive between them. If so, your 'raised deck' would go either at the nose of one car between the stairs, or you may find it pretty useful to have one at the nose of each car. Just added storage there where it makes sense.

Ah, I wasnt clear. The metal bits were just to use when using the pulley (if you go that route). You'd have them up for a few hour at the most. The 'upper deck' you support from the floor (wood 4x4) with no attachment to the ceiling at all. Humm, thinking about it, there's gonna be a center spot at the front of the raised deck which you can't permanently mount a wood support to unless you have short enough cars to spare off that space forever. Adjustable temp metal jacks would be then shortened whern a heavy load is on the deck, and placed there (presumably you will never leave the cars in there if you suspect flooding to where you'd lift the tools).

I was thinking of that too, but it looked pnematic and the seals can go on you. The wrong time to find out it's too old to work, is when you need it. A simple mechanical pulley hasn't those issues.

Grin, things change and the GF of today, becomes the SWMBO eventually. At least, one of them will. Believe me, I know. I am one of those (hehehehe).

Yup! It was a fun one to think about.
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On 2/25/2010 5:02 PM, cshenk wrote:

What letters? There are just words: "car 1" and "car 2" are separated by the internal staircase leading to the upstairs. The front end of that room is open to each side as is a small passthrough by the garage doors. What you see in the front of the house is garage door, front door, then another garage door. But the inside of the garage is connected along that back wall with a good 8 feet in front of each car. Then there's another doorway leading into the back room, labeled "shop" That room is approximately 15' X 40'.
I wasn't proposing to build anything in the garage to store tools on. I'm going to keep my tools in the shop.
Jay
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Read SHOP vertical. Those are the letters and at first confused me.
s h o p
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Read SHOP vertical. Those are the letters and at first confused me.
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 09:10:36 -0500, Jay Hanig

_Industrial Mobile Stackable Scaffolding Scaffold - 1000 Lb Load_ *
When not in use collapse them for storage. A winch / block and tackle with get the lifting done. Craigslist, you may find some cheaper scaffolds.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Just an idea :-/
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On 2/24/2010 6:54 PM, Oren wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I like this. I'd want to avoid the shipping costs if I could.... it almost doubles the cost. But I could fit anything less than 6 feet wide under it. With two of them stacked I could go all the way to the ceiling and then some. Of course, I lose the length of the block and tackle from the ultimate height I could lift.
More food for thought.
Jay
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Jay Hanig wrote:

room ceiling, to hang a Harbor Freight winch from. When bad weather is predicted, open hatch, and winch all expensive tools up into living room, close and dog down hatch. Picture a cross between a barn loft and a ship hatch. Tell people smugglers used to use it.
If it floods bad enough to blow out the blow-out walls on ground floor, 4 feet will not be enough. (You don't need much wave action- a gentle swell will blow out a stud wall.)
-- aem sends...
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get some 35/55 gal. plastic drums. set plywood on top. strap drums to ply.
floats itself when water rises.
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On 2/24/2010 9:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@altavista.net wrote:

Still gotta get those heavy tools onto the platform.
Jay
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How about a simple ramp?
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On 2/25/2010 9:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Can you image the footprint of a ramp gentle enough to manhandle a 500 lb jointer up 5 feet?
Jay
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The key word is MANHANDLE. Get a couple of buddies or neighbors to help you for a few minutes when you figure the storm of the century is on its way, and manhandle the equipment up the ramp. Heck, a rope and pulley, hook it to tow point on the car and drive forward.
A 10 foot ramp is only a 30 degree angle. 15 feet is only 20 degrees. Steep yes but it's not like he's running the equipment up and down the ramp every day. Maybe once every 10-15 years.
It just doesn't make sense to have an elaborate hoist system for something that is going to be used so infrequently. The ramp can be stowed up on the platform, or against a wall. It won't rust up solid and not work when you need it like metal pullies can.
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