Need quick advice for fixing galvanized horizontal hot water pipe in crawlspace (first time)

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I need basic direction for fixing a 3/4" steel galvanized hot-water pipe which developed a leak right in the middle of a 50' horizontal run (probably put there in the 1960s' in the crawl space).
I saw temporary tape and putty patches but I'd rather replace the section that is leaking.
I'm sure I cut the bad section out and replace with a new pipe but what I don't understand is how to make the connection.
I mean, one side will be easy but then as I try to screw in the other side, it will unscrew the first side.
How does one replace a section of galvanized steel pipe?
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Elmo wrote:

You will probably want to use 2 sections of new pipe, and connect them together with a fitting known as a "union"
http://www.qualityfasteners.com/Pipe%20Fittings/galvunion.JPG
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KPCdndeN8Me73MDWnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.com

I used to be an amateur plumber, but never had a chance to join the union.
Getting a union plumber might be the best bet, though.
"I don't really have a replacement career, it's a very gnawing thing."
Bob Morein (215) 646-4894
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I also viewed that image, but it's seriously huge compared to my browser.
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Put in a union fitting in the line...

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*For all of the effort you will put into replacing one section of galvanized pipe you could probably solder in copper for the whole run. You may decide that it needs to be done after removing the leaky pipe and seeing its condition on the inside.
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I agree with this post. While you're at the store you might want to get some pipe insulation as well so your hot water heater isn't heating your crawl space.
nate
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Begin NEW, its less work in the long run and pretty cheap.
Replace the entire run with PEX.
What OP doesnt know YET that fixing one leak will bring 2 more, and it just gets worse:( Plus the line is likely clogged with rust since galvanized rusts from the inside out.......
PEX is cheap flexible freeze tolerant and easy to work with.
Just replace the entire hot run from a convenient easy to reach place, right to the faucets it feeds.
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On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 06:07:12 -0500, John Grabowski wrote:

I don't mind replacing it with copper.
Can you just suggest what width of copper would be for a 3/4" steel galvanized replacement and what would the ends look like?
Would it be 3/4" copper? And do I need anything special to connect the copper to the galvanized at the two ends?
It's your basic ranch house with the kitchen on one end and the bathrooms on the other end.
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On Jan 25, 9:59am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

I am not a plumber, so I don't know if any kind of dielectric fitting is desirable here or not. It ought to be easy enough to find a simple 3/4" FIP to 3/4" copper sweat fitting though.
I think that what several people are hinting at is that if you have to replace 50' of pipe it might be more advantageous to only connect to the old galvanized at the "feed" end, and just continue the copper on to wherever it eventually ends up. As others have stated, this may be your *first* leak but it probably won't be your last.
nate
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*Make the replacement 3/4" copper. I can't see how your plumbing is hooked up, but there are fittings available for just about every configuration. You may need copper female adapters that will thread onto the galvanized and you can then solder your copper pipe to it
There are dielectric fittings available that are used for pipes of dissimilar metal being connected together.
Try going to a plumbing supply when they are not busy and maybe one of the counter guys will help you out.
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I would cut the pipe and disconnect it at the nearest threaded fitting, Screw in a couple of Sharkbite adapters and plug in some PEX, copper or CPVC. Things can go wrong when you do this. Backup plan should be call the plumber. Oh yeah, run a ground wire connecting the galvanized pipes together.
Jimmie
Jimmie
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Compression fittings for galvanized pipe can come in handy for a repair like this .
Jimmie
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Do those exist? I can't say as I've heard of those.
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Yep, known as "Dressler" couplings. Redneck repair, cut pipe at leak and insert a Dressler. But if the galvanised has sprung one leak, others will follow.
Harry K
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 07:35:07 -0800 (PST), Harry K wrote:

To report back, I finished the job, thanks to all of you for the advice.
Since dialectric unions are nowhere to be found here in California due to the lead-free requirement that went into effect on the 1st of the month, I opted to replace the original leaking 1960's 3/4 inch galvanized pipe with 30 feet of galvanized 3/4 inch pipe.
The job was harder and easier than I thought it would be.
What was really hard was getting the 45-year-old pipes apart; and getting the very last coupling to not leak!
What was much easier than I thought was putting the threaded pipes together; every fitting but the last fitting was really easy to assemble.
I'll report at the bottom of the thread the steps I performed so that someone else in the same predicament can follow in our footsteps.
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Elmo wrote:

I just can't EVEN imagine WHY you would go to all that problem when a pex fix would have taken 1/2 hour at most.
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 20:55:23 -0600, Steve Barker wrote:

Two reasons, neither of them real good reasons.
1. I really don't understand the pex stuff. Copper I understand (but I couldn't find a lead-free California dialectric union). Galvanized 1:1 replacement I (finally) understood. But, I never did understand the PEX stuff.
2. When I asked the Home Depot plumbing guy about PEX pipe, he said he only had the fittings, and not the pipe. He didn't seem to understand it all that much himself. When I asked him what "most people do", he said they replace galvanized with galvanized.
So I did. I really should look up this PEX stuff so as to see what else I could have done.
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On Jan 31, 12:05pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

I understand it but I find it is easier to uses PVC/CPVC instead. Can of glue, hacksaw and a handful of cheap fittings will fix almost any problem. The only advantage I see to PEX is it's flexible. Drawback is the cost of the tool to use it.
Harry K
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Home depot here sells some pretty cheap PEX tools, 40 bucks gets the job done. Although 300 bucks gets you the deluxe version
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