Natural Gas Line for Outdoor Grill

I have a natural gas outlet in the back of my house-- a line coming from the basement. I will be buying a new gas grill (configured for natural gas) and would like to use natural gas instead of propane. I need to run a gas line to the grill, a distance of about 10-12 feet. What type of pipe or flexible pipe do I need to use for this project? Is this something I can do-- I am reasonably handy-- or do I need a licensed plumber to do it?
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Flexible lines are limited to 2-3 feet if I remember correctly. I am unaware of any flex gas lines that are available for HO that are rated for UG or surface installations. If your comfortable about cutting and threading the black iron pipe then by all means do it yourself. It could be a job because there is usually not a stub out that you can just tie on to. Do not for get to put valves on both ends. Small price to pay if you need to work on the grill or pipe. Better be sure that the line your going to tap into is not connected to something that will be running when the grill is running or you could have some problems. If you have never pressure tested a gas line or checked for leaks, it is time to hire a pro.
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Around here they allow both K Copper and galvanized. But... check with your utility first!
Also around here they specifically do not require licenced plumbers for gas. Seems odd to me, but thats the way it is. Again, check with your building department first.
I had NG (via black iron pipe) and it was great, since it effectively didn't cost anything and couldn't run out. But then the pipe rusted out. One of these days I intend on replacing it, which is why I am so well versed on our local requirements.
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wrote:

You can do it using black pipe threaded on both ends. Configure a "T" trap. Fasten at least two supports on the 12 foot run. Use pipe dope and carefully check your completed joints for leaks using warm soapy water (this is important).
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Use pipe

Obviously a leak is bad because it wastes gas, but how dangerous is a minor leak outdoors, really. I doubt you could ignite it, let alone have it explode. Am I wrong?
Indoors of course is a whole different story because it can build up, but outdoors it would disperse.
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This is Turtle.
If your not versed on working with plain screw pipe , get a plumber. If you are run screw pipe to it and do check with Mr. Bubbles stuff from Walmarts for leaks. You know the Children type stuff to blow bubbles with and it will show a leak real good. They have it in a 1/2 Gal. size for $1.99 . I even use it for very small freon leaks and works good.
Now if you might get the mobile model of the Nat. Grills. They have a hose kit with a 25 foot hose to run to it.
TURTLE
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My gas grill is attached to our natural gas line. The line to the grill is copper. Indoors, in the basement, the run is about 12 feet. Once it pokes through the top of the basement wall, it runs about six feet buried in dirt about an inch or two between a course of bricks and a poured concrete patio. A moron from a lawn cutting service we no longer use cut right through it one day with a gas powered edge trimmer even though the line was previously pointed out. Amazingly, at least to me, there was no fire or explosion. When I arrived home at the end of the day, the smell of gas was quite intense. I cut the gas supply to the grill from the basement where I have a cutoff just for the grill. I replaced the tubing myself using the appropriate type of copper. If you have never worked with Swagelok fittings and gas, you might want to get someone with experience to help you. Water tight is much easier than gas tight. You can use soap water to find any leaks or something made for gas leaks like Snoop. Snoop leaves no residue but this shouldn't be important in your case.
Good Luck.

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I recently ran an extension off a stub for a firepit( with a "T" to go to a soon to be built Grill). A friend of mine is a commercial plumber and gave me a hand. He suggested, and we used, ceramic coated gas pipe (from Home depot). It wasn't that much more expensive, and saved us from taping the entire length( about 40 feet) of pipe. We did tape the joints of course.( 10 mil I believe)
I had originally had an estimate from several companies to do this for me...$650-800, and I had to did the trench, no thanks.
We did it over the course of a weekend at the total cost of about $100.00.

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