My house tipped over

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I spent the last 5 weeks building a nice deck on the front of my house. It sticks out from the house 10 feet and covers the whole front of the house. I built it without posts, so it just attached to the house.
When it was completed, I walked out to the edge, and all of a sudden my house tipped over. Now the house sits as a 45 deg angle being held in place by the deck. And the front of the deck is now touching the lawn.
How do I fix this?
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On Sun, 09 Aug 2015 21:45:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@untested.com wrote:

Very easy, this kind of thing happens all the time. Just build the same size deck on the back of the house and when it's complete stand near the edge and let gravity do the rest.
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snipped-for-privacy@untested.com wrote:

You are a troll, plonk!
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 09 Aug 2015 21:45:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@untested.com wrote:

Whatever you do, don't leave where you're standing.
Or it will plop back and break things.

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As this problem is clearly a direct affect of global warming, er, I mean climate change, it will be impossible to fix. If only you had used fewer fossil fuels during your hedonistic life. Serves you right.
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Move to Guam.
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On Sun, 9 Aug 2015 23:36:14 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Neill Massello) wrote:

No, no, no, Guam will tip over if too many people go there! At least the honorable Hank Johnson thinks so.
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wrote:

You must give the Generals a lot of credit for holding their knee slapping and gut busting laughter until after the hearing.
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On Mon, 10 Aug 2015 14:17:56 -0700, "taxed and spent"

The really sad thing is that idiot is still in office.
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wrote:

Perhaps he is less harmful than some of the "smart" ones.
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On 8/10/15 5:17 PM, taxed and spent wrote:

catcher in the history of baseball?
He had a law practice for 25 years and was a magistrate for 10 of those years. He was elected to congress in 2006. His first bill said street patrols in Iraq should be turned over to the Iraqis. I'd call him a cut above Rumsfeld, who expressed indifference to GI requests for armored HUMVs. He also said units must not be deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan unless certified mission capable, unless the president waived that for a particular unit, for national security.
The Atlanta Journal Constitution found him pretty sharp. So did his constituents. Sixty percent were black, but he took 99.9% of the vote in 2008.
He was diagnosed with Hepatitis C in 1998. He said he didn't know how he'd contracted it. The virus wasn't even proved to exist until 1989, so in those days, hospitals weren't good at screening blood or making sure surgical equipment was safe.
In February of 2010, he completed a successful treatment at Walter Reed, but the disease had left him underweight and easily confused. That would explain his inappropriate metaphor the following month. Constituents still had faith in him. He took 75% of the vote in November. Since then, he has regained his acuity and gained weight.
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wrote:

"On October 5, 2014 The Washingtonian published their 15th biennial "Best & Worst of Congress" list. This is a unique perspective of how congressional staffers see elected members of congress. The process is simple, ALL staffers -of all offices- get ballots asking for the best and worst elected members of congress in various categories. Rep. Hank Johnson was voted "Worst Speaker" and "Most Clueless" by congressional staffers."
Sixty percent were black, but he took 99.9% of the vote

he ran unopposed.
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On 8/10/15 11:15 PM, taxed and spent wrote:

The flagship of Cox Enterprises, the Atlanta Journal Constitution is a conservative newspaper with an excellent reputation.
The Washingtonian was a sideline for the director of a private art collection founded by his wealthy parents. It was about the high life: the best restaurants, neighborhoods, and divorce lawyers. His widow tries to continue the fluffy tradition.
I have trouble evaluating a couple of dozen candidates on a ballot. How well do you think hundreds of secretaries and interns can compare 435 members of congress? If Johnson won, it shows he'd gotten the word out with his hilarious youtube video.
You can be led by a liberal inside-the-beltway magazine if you wish. I'll take my advice from a fine conservative newspaper.

fact, three write-ins ganged up against him. Together, they got 0.1% of the vote. Only one voter in a thousand didn't want to endorse him.
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 10 Aug 2015 22:32:35 -0400, J Burns

I gave blood around 1988, and soon got a letter from the Red Cross saying I had non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitits, something not really known to exist at the time (Since C wa a catch-all for a while) and that I shouldnt' give blood anymore. They do this diagnosis based not on any symptoms I had but on values of certain things in the blood.
I didn't really like giving blood, so that was a good, compelling excuse.
Then 15 years later I got a letter from them (It pays not to move) telling me that new information or new studies or something meant I didnt' have hepatitis after all...... but I still shoudn't give blood. My internist couldnt' explain that.
But I guess I have the best of both worlds, I'm not sick but I don't have to give blood. Well I would like to, except when I'm doing it.

Wow. So that's the rest of the story.

I've gained weight!
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On 8/11/15 12:37 AM, micky wrote:

One morning in January of 1980, I suddenly felt cold. I got into a mummy sleeping bag in a warm room. I couldn't get warm. For four days, I couldn't eat, a flight of stairs was exhausting, and i couldn't get warm except in the shower. It was a mystery. Until a few minutes before I got into the sleeping bag, my health had seemed excellent.
I finally went to the neighborhood doctor. He flew into a rage when I walked in. He said he knew I had hepatitis because my eyes were yellow. He told me to get to a hospital before I infected the whole town.
I didn't know why he would insinuate that I had an infectious disease that decent citizens didn't get, unless me presumed I was a substance abuser. Why of course! I was a Vietnam veteran. You can never live down a disgrace like that.
There I was, deathly ill, cold, and weak, and I couldn't even stay in bed. He was banishing me from his town without even telling me what was wrong. It was snowing. There were already 5" on the roads. The VA hospital was 20 miles away. The trip would take an hour or so, most of it standing at bus stops in the blowing snow.
I'd never really come back from Vietnam. Now I felt like I was there, and I was glad. "Easy come, easy go, it never was my country anyway."
I'd seen pieces of Midnight Cowboy on TV. I figured I'd end up like Dustin Hoffman, dead and cold on a bus seat. It was a long walk up the driveway in the snow to the hospital. They took blood. Except for immunizations, 57 stitches for 8 wounds in the Marines, and a cortisone shot after treatment for a broken elbow had been withheld 3 years in the Coast Guard, that was the only time I'd been stuck with a needle, but the neighborhood doc seemed to have me pegged as a drug addict.
I sat for hours in the waiting area, cold, weak, and nauseous. Then I was called in to see a young doctor. He told me I had mononucleosis. Nothing could be done for me, and I'd be sick for six months. He told me to go home.
I doubted I'd make it. With no treatment, I would have been better off if I'd never gotten out of bed, but I was glad I'd come. Now I knew what was killing me. More important, he knew I was a Vietnam veteran but hadn't talked to me like scum. I'd been back 12 years, and that was a novelty.
When I got back, I found I could eat a little. For weeks, I slept around the clock, unable to stay awake more than 15 minutes. Climbing stairs was exhausting. It was six weeks before I could step outside and seven months before I felt fairly well.
Many people don't even know they have mononucleosis, but it's fatal in 2% of males. Normally, swelling of the liver and spleen is a clinical symptom. In the unlucky few, the virus explodes when it hits the liver, and they die of necrosis.
I don't think my liver ever swelled. It must have been wiped out in a matter of minutes. I believe my liver made a lot of glycogen. It could keep me going all day without getting hungry or thirsty, but I think it was like gunpowder and the virus was a spark. Without a liver to make vital substances and detoxify, I could only lie there getting cold like a corpse.
I think two things saved me. Without a liver, I don't think I was making anything to sustain the virus, and a liver can regenerate. In 96 hours, I think I had enough liver function to keep me alive, but I didn't know it because I was following civilization's hypocritical rule to pursue medical attention. That could have killed me and was probably a big setback to my recovery. Who cares? The goal of medicine is money.
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On 8/11/2015 8:18 AM, J Burns wrote:

I'm glad you survived both Vietnam and mono.
Thank you for serving, too.
--
Maggie

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On 8/11/2015 8:18 AM, J Burns wrote:

and varied. Often times the spleen gets enlarged, which if very dangerous. High, sustained fever is another. Many people get bad cases of jaundice. As far as I know, there's no real treatment other than to address what symptoms you present with. I had the swollen spleen, the jaundice and ran 105 temp for 10 days. It was pretty bad. 2 months later, I was much better, but was told to tread lightly because I would be more likely than others to come down with it again.
I'm glad you survived because I know how tough it can be.
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On 8/11/15 4:20 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_liver_failure
If I couldn't get warm in a mummy sleeping bag in a warm room, and I was very weak, and my eyes were yellow, acute liver failure sounds like a suitable diagnosis, although I wasn't told it.
It says ACL is the rapid onset of liver dysfunction in a person without known prior liver disease. It says "hyperacute" occurs within 7 days. Mine was more like 7 minutes.
When the local doctor saw my yellow eyes, his best bet might have been acetaminophen overdose. The second might have been reaction to medication. The third, too much to drink. The usual infectious agents are Hepatitis A and B, but A comes in epidemics from contaminated food and water.
That leaves B, transmitted by sharing needles. About 1% if Americans are infected. Few are treated because only 1% have the potential to cause ALF. There was a 1 in 10,000 chance that a person would have acute liver trouble from hepatitis B. The only reason to assume I had hepatitis B was an assumption that I was a junkie. I'd lived in the community 15 years, and nothing in my behavior suggested that. It had to be because I was a Vietnam veteran. (A few years later, Johnny Carson made the serious announcement that he thought it was time for "us" to forgive the Vietnam veterans.)
The VA doctor was more polite in the way he told me to go to hell, but he, too, treated me like Lazarus. He told me there was no treatment for mono, and I mustn't drink any beer for 6 months because my liver was shot. Did he assume I was a boozer because I was a Vietnam veteran?
Somewhere I've read that in 1% of cases, mono "explodes" when it hits the liver, and the victims are normally males. That's where I got the 2% figure for males. Now I've found an abstract of research done from 1998 to 2012.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10620-014-3029-2
They said ALF is uncommon, and the fatality rate is high. They studied records of 1887 ALF cases between 1998 and 2012. All were 18-44 years old and 75% male. Of these, 4 (0.21%) were caused by the EB virus. All were treated with an antiviral agent. Two died and a third needed a liver transplant.
I think ALF may be much more common. It takes lab work to diagnose it. If the criteria are met, wouldn't the doctor be likely to say it was previously undiagnosed chronic failure? Similarly, if a doctor determined that it was acute, would he even look for a link to something seemingly as unlikely as the EB virus? Many report that the cause is unknown, or perhaps he could blame a medication that might cause ALF.
Five years earlier, my father had suffered a severe illness that started the same way: suddenly, he couldn't get warm. I didn't connect the two cases because they said mine was mono and his was Epstein-Barr. We had large glycogen stores in common. He might eat a light breakfast, then not slow down to eat until 11 PM.
I figure the virus affects most livers like a torpedo hitting a battleship. You might not even notice, or you might suffer inconvenience until the damage can be repaired. I figure a liver full of glycogen is like an aircraft carrier full of aviation fuel.
As the rector of a parish with 700 households, he got the best doctors. They put him in an iron lung. His breathing soon recovered, but his legs were weak and painful for the rest of his life. He'd become a priest on account of his legs. After college, his ambition was to break in with the Red Sox. His running and jumping were exceptional. Baseball mattered more than religion to the bishop. He saw him play and recruited him.
I was lucky to be a Vietnam veteran. The doctors directed me to the gutter, and I had a pleasant recovery. For a fan of Sad Sack, sleeping around the clock for a few weeks was ideal. Think of all the idiotic TV and conversation I avoided! The day I felt strong enough to step outside, I walked two miles to the library, caught up on periodicals, and walked back. I wasn't up to par, but I was doing fine.
I experienced no usual symptoms of mono. Maybe my immune system overcame the virus fast, if not fast enough for my liver. Vitamins A and D are vital to the immune system. An enlightened diet may have been my father's disadvantage.
My mother had quit serving liver when I was a teen because medical fashion said Vitamin A was dangerous. You were supposed to get it from beta carotene, but medical fashion said to serve vegetables raw or blanched because cooking destroyed vitamins. Unfortunately, the human gut can't get much nutrition from vegetables that aren't cooked soft. You were supposed to get beta carotene in vitamin pills, but medical fashion said not to eat fat at breakfast. Without fat to trigger the secretion of bile, beta carotene doesn't become vitamin A.
My father used to love reading shirtless in the sun, but a few years before his illness, his doctor ordered him to avoid the sun because that was the latest medical fashion. Medical fashion said to get vitamin D from vitamin pills, but the usual supplement in pills was more useful to rats than humans. The supplement usually found in milk was better, but medical fashion said not to drink much.
When I enlisted, I was glad to get liver again, and I found I loved vegetables cooked soft. I didn't avoid the sun. (In Vietnam, I got so much sun that I looked like a gingerbread boy with bleached, curly hair, not the dark, straight hair I'd had at home. I guess that's how I caught the eye of the princess.)
Unlike my enlightened parents, I ate dumb, old-fashioned food and followed a dumb, old-fashioned lifestyle. I figured we dumb people must have been doing something right because there were lot more of us alive than there were smart people.
Sixteen years after his time in the iron lung, his doctor ordered him to avoid dairy products because that was the latest medical fashion. A year later, he had terminal throat cancer. Fed up with doctors, he declined treatment because it was known to be useless except of course to bring in lots of insurance money.
My siblings smugly said it was his own fault for smoking a pipe, which he'd quit on doctor's orders 20 years earlier. That was medical fashion. The medical industry ignored the Surgeon General's 1964 report on smoking. It proved cigarettes killed but noted that pipe smokers lived 3 years longer than men who had never smoked.
His cancer was rare in America but common in China, where so many people had it and so many smoked that it could be determined that there was no statistical correlation. That kind of cancer is caused by the EB virus. In ordering my father to avoid any sun or milk, the doctors crippled his immune system. The common virus that had once put him in an iron lung, came back to kill him.
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On 8/12/2015 10:17 PM, J Burns wrote: [...]

Are you any relation to Paul Harvey?
--
Maggie

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On 8/12/15 11:50 PM, Muggles wrote:

No, but I think I see the connection. He died at a hospital, surrounded by family and friends, but the cause was never released. ALF? It didn't occur to the doctor to check for the EB virus? His family didn't want the public to assume he was a junkie?
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