Must be a better way to protect chair legs on tile floors

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Three times in the past three years I've bought a complete set of rubber foot protectors for the wooden chairs that are slid day in and day out on the tile floors.

I first bought the dark brown rubber chair leg protectors from Home Depot; then the black protectors at Lowes; and finally the cream colored rubber chair leg protectors at ACE Hardware.
They all crack and simply fall apart.
Do they make a rubber chair leg protector that won't fall apart in a year? Where can I get them?
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why use rubber? just use a nylon cushion glide http://www.homedepot.com/p/Shepherd-1-1-8-in-Plastic-Base-Nail-On-Cushion-Glides-4-Pack-9448/100073977 or just a felt pad http://www.homedepot.com/p/Shepherd-3-4-in-Heavy-Duty-Self-Adhesive-Felt-Pads-20-Pack-9951/100019164
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On Tue, 07 May 2013 23:03:48 -0500, ChairMan wrote:

You know, I hadn't even thought of that! I like both ideas, if for no other reason than they won't crumble like the rubber does, in just a year.
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Danny,
I like felt. Doesn't damage the floor and lasts about 10 yrs.
Dave M.
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'David L. Martel[_2_ Wrote: > ;3059058']Danny,

I think so ....
--
anisagimran


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wrote:

Self-adheseive won't stay on. They're meant for heavy or metal tschotchkes on a wood table, so as not to scratch the table.
The first ones, the glides, are good.
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If you put them on right they will stick. I've put them on many dining chairs, lounge chairs and even sofas. Must be a clean surface, and it helps to tap them with a hammer to make sure they adhere. The grout lines may be a little tough on them, but they work flawlessly on wood floors
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Chair Man,
I use felt but not stick-ons. My pads look like the plastic glides that you picture. Think I bought them at Ace Hardwware.
Dave M.
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n-Plastic-Base-Nail-On-Cus...

elf-Adhesive-F...
+1
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Chinese.
I don't understand why anyone would want to slide on rubber. I've used the nail on nylon as shown in other post. I would drill a hole first. Last summer I was making sofa legs. I was looking for larger sized ones for rug. I ended up using just hardwood, and sanding smooth edge, and painted.
Greg
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On Wed, 08 May 2013 04:10:00 +0000, gregz wrote:

I didn't know any better. I'm just amazed that the rubber falls apart in a year. So, I'll try the nail-on or felt stick-on types and report back in a year or so.
Thanks.
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Open your yellow pages to Upholsterers and phone around to find out who sells upholstery supplies in your area. The upholstery supply places will carry a completely line of feet and casters for chairs of all sorts.
I'm wondering if you couldn't drill holes in the bottoms of those chair legs and use rubber casters on them(?)
--
nestork


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A caster on that small diameter leg would split it
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wrote:

Note to self; Don't ever use a grouted tile floor where furniture will be slid around.
If I had one, my first stop would be the biggest, fanciest, tile store in the area to see what they recommend.
I like those teflon gliders that get tacked into the legs---- but I think about twice over that grout line and they'd break right off.
God-awful-ugly, IMO, but I'd be tempted to put a smooth gliding surface over the tile.
Googling for the name of that - I ran across the ones I use in my kitchen, on vinyl, but they say they are for ceramic tile, too-- I'm wary, but here's the link; (Amazon.com product link shortened) Let us know what you find for a solution.
Jim
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++!
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wrote:

Plainly, you have the wrong size. This one is too small. They may not make the right size.
By nylon glides that nail into the bottom of the legs, with a metal nail and a nylon disk almost as big as the leg's bottom. . A) That will work. B) Rubber is t he wrong material when you say you are sliding them on TILE floors.

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On Wed, 08 May 2013 15:20:01 -0700, Oren wrote:

That is a gorgeous photo!
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For some reason it made me think of Poodles wearing Mukluks..
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The photo made me think of aerial attack. Bombers dropping chairs on an English outdoor high class cafe that was serving decorator oranges to cultured, discriminating customers.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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a customer of mine has tennis balls on the bottoms of chair legs.....
floor looks awesome:)
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